The Target Skytrain wrap, as well as station branding, photos via sengsuriya; thanks, Sophia! I also spotted the Canada Line Target train!

colinupton:

Famous Bus Rides #4

1988

Has anyone spotted it yet?  Huh?  Well, how much gas does a electric trolley bus carry? Ah-ha.  I knew at the time I drew this it wasn’t accurate but I went ahead and did it, mostly beause I really wanted to draw a Brill bus.  The Brills had been soldiering on for decades on the streets of Vancouver but they were being retired, probably sold off to Cuba or somewhere, and I wanted to commemorate them.  I was on my way to a comic con that day.

Pigement marker on Letraset paper.

Please note that this mini-comic and many others are available from Colin Upton Comics - colinupton@telus.net - both individually and in sets at reasonable prices.

Purchasing the Future, an oil canvas by Leanne Christie. From the artist’s website: 

The CPR railway station at the foot of Granville with the queue to purchase Shaughnessy Land.
Shaughnessy was named after the CPR president: Thomas Shaughnessy and was part of the land deal the CPR had struck with the Canadian government during negotiations about the railways expansion West.

Inspired by this Vancouver Archives photo by Philip Timms, September, 1909.

Purchasing the Future, an oil canvas by Leanne Christie. From the artist’s website

The CPR railway station at the foot of Granville with the queue to purchase Shaughnessy Land.

Shaughnessy was named after the CPR president: Thomas Shaughnessy and was part of the land deal the CPR had struck with the Canadian government during negotiations about the railways expansion West.

Inspired by this Vancouver Archives photo by Philip Timms, September, 1909.

The Rocky Mountains, from Calgary to Vancouver by Mrs. Adelaide Langford, 1916, as seen in the lobby of Vancouver’s Waterfront Station. Born circa 1856 Adelaide Elizabeth Winyard Hurd, she passed away in 1939, living to about age 83. From The Hedley Gazette, March 29, 1917:

Review of C.P.R. Work for 1916
Important Undertakings Marked the Activities of the Company During the Year

The year 1916 was an interesting one in the history of the Canadian Pacific Railway. It has been a year of progress even though the Dominion is struggling in a great war…

…The walls of the spacious waiting hall of the new Canadian Pacific Railway Station at Vancouver have been recently beautified by a series of rural decorations representing the principal mountains from Calgary to Vancouver. The decorations are the work of Mrs. Adelaide Langford, an artist with a wide reputation…

While Mrs. Adelaide Langford may have had a wide reputation at the time of the article, she is not well remembered today. I came upon an article from 1927 when she was about 71 which provides further insights into her work. Below is a transcript of the article from 1927 seen above:

The Morning Leader - August 6, 1927

Pictures by Canadian Woman Adorn Many European Homes

Duke of Cambridge and Other Noted Collectors Have Acquired Paintings From Brush of Vancouver Artist

To have the work of one’s life adorn many of the stately mansions of the world is the proud achievement of one western woman in the person of Mrs. Adelaide Langford of Vancouver, B.C., many of whose canvases are hung in old ancestral homes in Europe, the late Duke of Cambridge, Sir Augustus Nanton and other distinguished collectors having acquired her work throughout England, Canada and the United States.

Mrs. Langford, whose pictures bear the signature “Adelaide Langford,” is the widow of the late Capt. H. Ayliffe Langford, and is a truly western artist of no mean ability. She is a student of the Slade school, London University, England, and is also a graduate of the Art Institute of Chicago, having studied under Frederick W. Freer, W. M. R. French and John H. Vanderpoel of Chicago, and has completed most of her work in the west. She inherits her artist gifts from parents and grandparents who were painters. She is the daughter of the late Thomas Gladwin Hurd, formerly of Toronto.

Mrs. Langford paints in a broad, free style, which has the distinction of the Barbizon school and marked individuality. She is a wonderful colorist and her canvases are truly decorative as well as restful. They are pictures which one can live with from day to day, finding added charm as they become more familiar. Among her recent works is an oil painting of the buffalo at Banff, Alta., completed just before the big drive when so many hundreds were extinguished. This hangs in the rotunda of the Royal Alexandra hotel in Winnipeg.

In an exhibit she is presenting now at Vancouver she is showing a painting of the Indian reserve at West Vancouver and the Indian village at North Vancouver; these are particularly attractive. She is also displaying her “Fraser Canyon,” painted at Yale, B.C., where the waters roar and tumble hundreds of feet below the railway line, and which is one of the beauty spots of the Rockies. In this Mrs. Langford has shown her knowledge and understanding of the great outdoors. The collection also includes pictures of English and continental scenery.

Mrs. Langford lost her husband during service of the late war; her son also served for several years in the motor boat patrol in the North Sea as well as Russia on special service and in the Arctic, for which he was decorated by the British and Russian governments. Mrs. Langford’s own charitable work will always remain in the minds of those who were closely associated with her during that time, and she was never at any time too engrossed in her own troubles that she could not find time to aid those less fortunate than herself.

[the original article incorrectly named John D. Vanderpoel instead of John H. Vanderpoel, and the Barbizon school was misspelled as the Barbazon school; these two errors are shown corrected in the text above]

According to Gary Sim’s British Columbia Artists:

An article "The Fine Arts", published June 9, 1923 in the Western Women’s Weekly, noted that Langford was a critic of the Studio Club. The Vancouver Studio Club and School of Art was a predecessor organization to the B.C. Society of Fine Arts, and began exhibiting in Vancouver as early as 1904. Founding members of the group included T.W. Fripp and Spencer Perceval Judge.

And according to National Soul: Canadian Mural Painting, 1860s - 1930s, “Langford’s brother-in-law was general superintendent of the Pacific Division of the Canadian Pacific Railway and likely was helpful in securing the commission for her.”

Ironically, the placement of these paintings at Waterfront Station so far from our line of sight has probably helped to preserve them. At the time of writing, it is not clear if any of her other paintings have survived. The Royal Alexandra Hotel in Winnipeg was demolished in 1971, though the dining room from the hotel has been preserved and rebuilt in Cranbrook at the Canadian Museum of Rail Travel. An email to the museum has determined that no paintings were included in the reconstructed hotel dining room. The CPR Archives has no record of the painting’s whereabouts either. It is unknown if paintings from the collection of Prince George, the late Duke of Cambridge, or Sir Augustus Nanton have survived. Just to be sure, I’ve sent a letter to the senior archivist at Windsor Castle…perhaps one of Adelaide Langford’s paintings has been passed down to the Royal family and remains in their collection to this day. I’ll keep you posted if I receive a reply…

Update! I did receive a reply from Buckingham Castle, and there is no record of any art by Mrs. Adelaide Langford remaining in the Royal collection! The archivist suspects it was auctioned off after the death of Prince George, the 2nd Duke of Cambridge by one of the major auctioneers of the day. The search continues!

Kenworth Truck Calendar, acrylic painting from 1979 by George McLachlan. The scene depicts the corner of Granville and Hastings, a popular intersection to take a picture perfect postcard, as many images in the Vancouver Archives are taken from this very same vantage point.

The name Kenworth came into being in 1923, and this truck appears to be from this early era. The style of manned traffic light system shown here remained in effect until 1928, according to Chuck Davis. This would explain why the Trorey Clock is missing from the painting, as Birks had purchased the Trorey business back in 1907 and moved the clock up to Georgia & Granville in 1913.

Gig poster for the Tubuloids, Sunday, April 6 at the Princeton Pub.

Gig poster for the Tubuloids, Sunday, April 6 at the Princeton Pub.

The evolution of the Buzzer logos, via the Buzzer blog. Translink’s Buzzer editors will be hosting a Google Hangout on Wednesday, March 27 at noon to 1pm Pacific. It’s your chance to chat all about the history of the Buzzer, plus get answers to any transit questions you might have. Check it out!

The evolution of the Buzzer logos, via the Buzzer blog. Translink’s Buzzer editors will be hosting a Google Hangout on Wednesday, March 27 at noon to 1pm Pacific. It’s your chance to chat all about the history of the Buzzer, plus get answers to any transit questions you might have. Check it out!

Coast Mountain Bus Company employees bid farewell to Oakridge Transit Centre, August 2006, a specially commissioned card by illustrator Barb Wood, who has been frequently featured here, and who has frequently included public transit in her artwork.
I got a behind the scenes tour of the Oakridge garage on one of the Trams excursions back in 2008, on the last ride of the E901/902 Flyers. Photos here.
Card courtesy of an insider at Translink. Thanks, eh!

Coast Mountain Bus Company employees bid farewell to Oakridge Transit Centre, August 2006, a specially commissioned card by illustrator Barb Wood, who has been frequently featured here, and who has frequently included public transit in her artwork.

I got a behind the scenes tour of the Oakridge garage on one of the Trams excursions back in 2008, on the last ride of the E901/902 Flyers. Photos here.

Card courtesy of an insider at Translink. Thanks, eh!

Canadian Pacific Railway Station, Vancouver BC, a souvenir plate made in Austria in the very early 1900s. Seen at Horseshoe Coins & Antiques in Blaine, WA, just over the border, a great little antiques shop full of Northwest lore. This item however, was for display only, part of the proprietor’s collection. Changing Vancouver covers the building’s story here; the building only lasted for about 10 years on account of poor quality bricks. Film footage of the station survives in the 1907 film by William Harbeck which you can learn much more about in the City Reflections DVD. Thanks for the photo, Derek!

Advert for Hume & Rumble Limited, electrical engineers, from page 7 of the Vancouver News-Herald, August 14, 1948. Ad copy states:

The Faith that Built Vancouver

"…mark my words Jim, this town’s gonna grow. In a few years you’ll need a horse and buggy to get from one end of Vancouver to the other. There’s gonna be thousands of people here…more streets…more stores…more homes. Yes, sir—there’s a great future right here and I aim to be part of it!"

Faith in its future built Vancouver from a collection of huts at the water’s edge to Canada’s third metropolis in two generations. The B.C. Electric Railway Co., Ltd has long been associated with this growth…played a major role. Hume & Rumble, Western Canada’s leading electrical contractors, have shared in this spirit for over 30 years…been closely connected with electrical installation work in many great B.C. Industries and enterprises. Latest of these, B.C. Electric’s new trolley coaches are an important milestone on the road of progress in British Columbia.

Vancouver is once again having a poster show inside Waterfront Station. Following on the heels of the fall of 2011 show By Any Other Name, Working Format has teamed up with a half dozen graphic designers to pay homage to these essential intersections in Vancouver:

  1. Main & Hastings (by Glasfurd & Walker) www.glasfurdandwalker.com
  2. Denman & Davie (by State Creative Group) www.statecreativegroup.com
  3. Broadway & Granville (by 10Four Design) www.10fourdesign.com
  4. Kingsway & Fraser (by Zach Bulick) www.zachbulick.com
  5. SE Marine & Knight (by Working Format) www.workingformat.com
  6. Water & Carall (by Setareh Shamdani) www.setareh-shamdani.com
  7. 4th & Vine (by Post Projects) | www.post-projects.com

The posters were designed by 10four Design, Glasfurd and Walker, Post Projects, Seterah Shamdani, State Creative, Working Format, and Zach Bulick.

Intersections will host an opening reception January 31 at the Chinatown Experiment (434 Columbia) from 6pm to 9pm. The evening is free and open to the public. Starting in February, Intersections will be on display at the Canada Line’s Platform Gallery in Waterfront Station. via VIAwesome.

I’m very much looking forward to this forthcoming comic set in early Vancouver titled Waterlogged by Cloudscape Comic’s Jeff Ellis. Look closely and you’ll see the Union Steamship Empress of Japan in the first panel!

japanese-cowboy:

Here’s a sneak peak of a few of my pages from Waterlogged.

translinked:

Renderings from the Evergreen Line image gallery. Coming summer 2016. “Photos, videos and artist renderings are available for use in whole or in part without permission provided they are used unaltered. No credit line is required.”

translinked:


Flying SkyTrain! My custom commission from Word Under the Street this year by Jesse Davidge. You may have gotten a peak at this drawing in my earlier post here; and this was the illustration that led to this month’s Buzzer cover! See the Buzzer Blog for the full interview. So awesome! Happy Christmas everyone!

translinked:

Flying SkyTrain! My custom commission from Word Under the Street this year by Jesse Davidge. You may have gotten a peak at this drawing in my earlier post here; and this was the illustration that led to this month’s Buzzer cover! See the Buzzer Blog for the full interview. So awesome! Happy Christmas everyone!

As a followup to Tuesday’s post, here is another comic from page 42 of the 1923 UBC Yearbook. This one features an unknown downtown Vancouver intersection filled with Photoshopped students attached to cartoon bodies. Note the jokes about alcoholic beverages (BC had repealed prohibition in 1921); the bar at bottom left has been relabeled “Soft Drinks” and across the street, above the Police Station is a billboard for “Cascade Garters, Always Falling; the Gear without a Peer” (see a beer ad with similar slogan). The comic is by “Meadows” and dated 1924.

Also added for good measure, an ad for REO Motors from page 5 of the same yearbook.