Stanley Park Christmas Train, Lost Lagoon Fountain Lights, and Carol Ships Vancouver Harbour (2010) by artist and illustrator George McLachlan.

The Stanley Park Christmas train runs December 5 through January 5, though it is closed Christmas Day. Tickets are available here at Ticketmaster with some reserved at the gates, but I would say advance tickets are a must (the time slots have a tendency to sell out very quickly). More from the City of Vancouver website:

Entrance to the Bright Nights Train Plaza is by donation (you don’t need to purchase train tickets to see the holiday lights)…Train tickets are sold in half-hour time slots. Several trains will depart within each time slot. Avoid the crowds and come out Monday to Thursday in the first two weeks…

Happy Holiday Travels!

Towards Stanley Park, a title I’ve given this watercolour painting by Gordon Kit Thorne, CPE, CSPE, FCA. It was Tom Carter who pointed out to me the building in the foreground is Vancouver’s former Customs and Immigration building, previously located where the Convention Centre is now. The painting appears to say “From the Marine Building” in Gordon’s handwriting in the bottom left, along with the date July 13, 1957, and, ehr, 1956 too (it’s got to be one of those two dates!). If you compare the view from the VPL photo 6193 also shown here, you can actually see the shadow of the Marine Building!

Screenprint and watercolour on paper by Linda Suffidy for Papergirl Vancouver 2013. PapergirlVan rides today! Top prize to whomever is lucky enough to score this print, which I have a hunch (just a hunch!) that it will be found somewhere along the seawall near Stanley Park! Birthday celebrations for the park continue all weekend.

via PapergirlVan 2013 on Flickr.

Special announcement! Sarah Holtom aka Sarah Fougere has just opened her show at the Black&Yellow Gallery at 602 E Hastings Street in Vancouver, and she begins her series of 50 Portraits in 15 days, which has already nearly sold out! Also in the show are a dozen lovely landscapes of Vancouver, including this one from the seawall at Stanley  Park. And what better image to feature on the weekend of Stanley Park’s 125th Birthday! Happy Birthday to everyone, and congrats, Sarah!

#SARAHFOUGERE #black&yellowgallery #6 #oilfromlife (at Stanley Park)

Special announcement! Sarah Holtom aka Sarah Fougere has just opened her show at the Black&Yellow Gallery at 602 E Hastings Street in Vancouver, and she begins her series of 50 Portraits in 15 days, which has already nearly sold out! Also in the show are a dozen lovely landscapes of Vancouver, including this one from the seawall at Stanley  Park. And what better image to feature on the weekend of Stanley Park’s 125th Birthday! Happy Birthday to everyone, and congrats, Sarah!

#SARAHFOUGERE #black&yellowgallery #6 #oilfromlife (at Stanley Park)

The Stanley Park entrance and Stanley Park Brewery, painted in 1897 by artist unknown, via the Vancouver Archives blog. Also shown here is a photograph of Jackson T. Abray (far left) and others in front of the entrance to the Cosmopolitan Hotel at 101 Cordova Street, also via VanArchives (I’ve tweaked the image, removing some reflective silver in the print). Note the ad for “Stanley Park Brewery, English Ales & Stout” in the background.

This post is somewhat of a milestone, as I have now reached 900 out of 1000 posts of my lofty ambition. I had a hard time deciding what to post for this milestone, as there has been much to choose from lately. I came across a great cartoon by Sam Logan at VanCAF 2013 at the Roundhouse last weekend. The winners of the Ironclad Art competition were just announced yesterday; congrats to Nigel Dembicki and Andrew Dexel for their winning entries! I’ve found some more Ron Jackson, a personal favourite of mine, and I’ve also recently rediscovered the work of Peter Ewart whom I hope to show more of in the future. However, I figured a celebratory post about beer would be fitting during Craft Beer Week.

To dig deeper into the history of the Stanley Park Brewery, you simply must track down a copy of Bill Wilson’s book “Beer Barons of BC" available from the author or at the VPL. He has also reprinted an updated version of the history of the Stanley Park Brewery in the Spring 2013 issue of BC History Magazine (TOC only) The article begins with this intriguing opening paragraph:

Former city Archivist J.S. Matthews certainly recognized its significance when, on July 24, 1944, he took the time to interview John Benson, the last person to operate the brewery. Benson’s interview provided some key answers, but questions still remained about this intriguing and iconic Vancouver business. Then in the summer of 1993, a few more tantalizing tidbits emerged in an article by Rosamond Greer in the British Columbia Historical News. Unfortunately, the details were again left out – the article actually created more questions than answers. Brewery historians still wondered about some of the basic questions regarding the company. Was the brewery actually in the park? What was the Royal Brewing Company’s involvement? Who actually brewed the beer? Was ginger beer actually made at the brewery? When did the company cease business? What actually happened to the brewery and when? These questions still had no answer…

And so with this milestone, I am officially taking a hiatus. I won’t be posting for the foreseeable future, but I hope to return to this blog at some point to complete the final 100 posts. I should also announce that I’ll be giving a talk about Illustrated Vancouver at the Vancouver Historical Society on Thursday, March 27, 2014, 7:30pm at Museum of Vancouver (more details posted here). I may post the occasional time sensitive entry between now and then, or perhaps Illustrated Vancouver will turn into a bi-weekly or monthly publication instead of a daily one. If you have anything to share, please feel free to use the submit button. Until next time, happy tumbling!

Cross-posted to VancouverIsAwesome.com.

Update! Bill Wilson sent me pictures of the only Stanley Park Brewery label design known to survive! And only two such labels are known to exist; the other one is a partial label on a bottle. It’s such a great piece of beer lore, I just had to include it! Thanks, Bill!

pss: The only way to pick up Bill’s book is to send $30 ($25 + $5 shipping) payable to Tamahi Publications, P.O. Box 46, Lantzville, B.C. V0R 2H0. The book is about ½ sold out!

Great Moments in Park Board History – 1909 by John Atkin. He writes on his blog:

In 1909, someone thought it might be a good idea to build grain elevators on Deadman’s Island. Park Board turned the idea down.

Great Moments in Park Board History – 1909 by John Atkin. He writes on his blog:

In 1909, someone thought it might be a good idea to build grain elevators on Deadman’s Island. Park Board turned the idea down.

Menus from days gone by, via the MoV. The Chilco Grill, the Lux Café, the Senator Grill, the Press Club, all circa 1948-1952, donated to the Museum of Vancouver by Mr. Sonny Farrington. About Sonny, from the items’ description:

Sonny Farrington b. 1923 in Flin Flon, Manitoba, moved to Vancouver in 1942 with his parents. The family lived at 11th Avenue and Yukon, and Sonny attended Edith Cavell Elementary School (where Pal’s Café was his favourite hang-out) and then King Edward High School. In 1945, Sonny’s mother got a job as a cook at Cunningham’s Grill in Union Market, and Sonny often stopped by there for a meal. Between ages 15 and 20, Sonny went to weekend Teen Town dances, and went out afterwards for something to eat. Many of these menus were obtained on such occasions. Many menus have thumbtack holes in them, where the donor displayed them on a wall or bulletin board…

As far as the Chilco Grill is concerned, Neil Whaley informs me that 710 Chilco Street (now a completely different residential tower built in the late 1950s) actually overlooked Lost Lagoon. The Lux Café, aka the House of Luxury at 616 Robson Street boasted “We Never Close”, proving Vancouver once knew how to party! The Senator Grill Soda Fountain was located at Cambie Street and 25th (King Edward Avenue). And the Press Club was situated at 548 Cambie Street Vancouver, not guaranteed to be politically correct! Thanks to Sonny for donating this remarkable collection to the Museum of Vancouver!

The Lions Gate Bridge, with Stanley Park to the right, seen from the North Shore. This painting by Lyttle is dated 1980; I am unable to determine who this might have been, so any suggestions would be appreciated. Thanks!

The Lions Gate Bridge, with Stanley Park to the right, seen from the North Shore. This painting by Lyttle is dated 1980; I am unable to determine who this might have been, so any suggestions would be appreciated. Thanks!

Concept sketch for Stanley Park Totem Pole Visitor Centre by Matthew Cencich, via flickr

This was a presentation board (building) I did for a visitor centre at the totem poles in Stanley Park in Vancouver.
The program called for washrooms for both sexes, a retail space, and a sheltered exhibit space. Too many people were peeing in the trees behind the totem poles and something had to be done. The open exhibit space was aligned to be exposed to water in both directions with a view towards the north shore mountains at the north end and coal harbour marina at the south end. I’d detail the cladding and upper glazing differently, and simplify the retail space layout now but I still like the double butterfly roof. This was presented to the parks board along with 2 other schemes…

The final scheme given the go-ahead was by Lubor Trubka Associates Architects, viewable here: http://www.lubortrubka.com/stanley_park.htm

Parks & Playgrounds, Vancouver BC brochure, dated 1925, seen at MacLeod’s Books recently. This cover depicts a proposed monument (I can’t recall if it was a column or an obelisk, sorry) at the end of the causeway entrance to Stanley Park, seen here overlooking Lost Lagoon. When the causeway was completed, they didn’t end up with a stone monument but erected a flagpole instead.
A reminder; TODAY there is a Walk in the Forest event at VanDusen Gardens. Come down from 12-2pm for a little art mob excursion! The 1976 modernist pavilion originally known as MacMillan-Bloedel Place is facing demolition, and Michael Kluckner, with support from Heritage Vancouver, would like to see it preserved. 

The building known as the Education Centre (also the Forest Education Centre) is a modernist masterpiece lost in the forest of an untended section of VanDusen Garden. Built in 1976, it was originally known as MacMillan-Bloedel Place, named for its donor, the largest forestry company in what was then the largest industry in British Columbia. Its unique educational displays, including a 50-seat theatre, were called “A Walk in the Forest.”Architect Paul Merrick, working then as chief designer for Thompson, Berwick & Pratt, set the pavilion into a small hill on the edge of a lake in the northwest part of the gardens. Its green roof was one of the first in the city, and its unique internal columns used some of the finest wood in British Columbia. It won the Canadian Architect Yearbook Award of Excellence Award in 1974, and was constructed by Halse-Martin of Vancouver. It was once an object of pride for the city, VanDusen Garden and the Park Board…
[read more]

Note this campaign is not endorsed by the Park Board or VanDusen Garden staff.

Parks & Playgrounds, Vancouver BC brochure, dated 1925, seen at MacLeod’s Books recently. This cover depicts a proposed monument (I can’t recall if it was a column or an obelisk, sorry) at the end of the causeway entrance to Stanley Park, seen here overlooking Lost Lagoon. When the causeway was completed, they didn’t end up with a stone monument but erected a flagpole instead.

A reminder; TODAY there is a Walk in the Forest event at VanDusen Gardens. Come down from 12-2pm for a little art mob excursion! The 1976 modernist pavilion originally known as MacMillan-Bloedel Place is facing demolition, and Michael Kluckner, with support from Heritage Vancouver, would like to see it preserved

The building known as the Education Centre (also the Forest Education Centre) is a modernist masterpiece lost in the forest of an untended section of VanDusen Garden. Built in 1976, it was originally known as MacMillan-Bloedel Place, named for its donor, the largest forestry company in what was then the largest industry in British Columbia. Its unique educational displays, including a 50-seat theatre, were called “A Walk in the Forest.”

Architect Paul Merrick, working then as chief designer for Thompson, Berwick & Pratt, set the pavilion into a small hill on the edge of a lake in the northwest part of the gardens. Its green roof was one of the first in the city, and its unique internal columns used some of the finest wood in British Columbia. It won the Canadian Architect Yearbook Award of Excellence Award in 1974, and was constructed by Halse-Martin of Vancouver. It was once an object of pride for the city, VanDusen Garden and the Park Board…

[read more]

Note this campaign is not endorsed by the Park Board or VanDusen Garden staff.

Vancouver Panorama, artist unknown, printed by Pierre Marc Products, Berkeley, California and distributed by the Vancouver Magazine Service Ltd. Because the Grouse Mountain tram is red, we can probably date this some time after or around 1976, when the original blue tram was upgraded with the new red Super Skyride tram. Seen via ebay.

Vancouver Panorama, artist unknown, printed by Pierre Marc Products, Berkeley, California and distributed by the Vancouver Magazine Service Ltd. Because the Grouse Mountain tram is red, we can probably date this some time after or around 1976, when the original blue tram was upgraded with the new red Super Skyride tram. Seen via ebay.

Vancouver From Kitsilano and Vancouver from Rowing Club, circa 1914, ink on paper, Ina D.D. Uhthoff (courtesy Mother Tongue Publishing), via VIAwesome.com. From The Life & Art of Ina D. D. Uhthoff by Christina Johnson-Dean, which came out late last year. You can purchase the book at MacLeod’s Books in downtown Vancouver. The entire series of Unheralded Artists of BC is outstanding, seeking to remedy some of the lost treasures of art history in our own backyard.

 The Sentinel of Stanley Park, a colour image by Paul Goranson, 14 x 18 inches. This was done in 1939 just before Paul went off to WWII, where along with E.J. Hughes and Orville Fisher, he became a celebrated war artist. Construction of the Lions Gate bridge had just been completed, there was no seawall around Stanley Park, and there was a famous cave to the right of Siwash Rock.
This appeared on Craigslist recently, and it seems it was a wedding gift to someone in the 1950s. A rare and extraordinary find; it might actually be the gouache original Goranson used to produce a linocut of the same image.

The Sentinel of Stanley Park, a colour image by Paul Goranson, 14 x 18 inches. This was done in 1939 just before Paul went off to WWII, where along with E.J. Hughes and Orville Fisher, he became a celebrated war artist. Construction of the Lions Gate bridge had just been completed, there was no seawall around Stanley Park, and there was a famous cave to the right of Siwash Rock.

This appeared on Craigslist recently, and it seems it was a wedding gift to someone in the 1950s. A rare and extraordinary find; it might actually be the gouache original Goranson used to produce a linocut of the same image.

Concept sketches by Michael Green Architecture, from his unsolicited proposal for a decentralized VAG with 4 satellite galleries. I’m not sold on the concept of fragmenting the gallery necessarily, but I do like the idea of a really great sculpture garden. This would be difficult to attain with just a single site, as there would likely only be a small rooftop or courtyard space available. Thus, I find the Phase 4 Stanley Park VAG / Blowdown gallery very compelling. We have the benefit of the Vancouver Sculpture Biennale temporarily programming sculpture throughout the entire city, but having something with a bit more permanence would be nice.

Main Diversion Entrance, Stanley Park, Vancouver, Canada; vintage transferware souvenir of Stanley Park from Gray’s Pottery in Stoke-on-Trent, England via ebay. Gray’s Pottery operated from 1907 to 1962, when it was sold and became Portmeirion Pottery. The image appears to be based on the postcard seen here, which might be from the 1930s, based on the era of the vehicles.

The entranceway to Stanley Park was reconfigured in 1926 to create the pedestrian promenade seen here. Designed by sculptor Charles Marega, the walkway was constructed with concrete mixed with sea sand, sadly resulting in a deteriorating, unsalvageable structure.