Expo 86 Beer Stein made in 1983 in Japan, via ebay.

Canadian Pacific Railway Station, Vancouver BC, a souvenir plate made in Austria in the very early 1900s. Seen at Horseshoe Coins & Antiques in Blaine, WA, just over the border, a great little antiques shop full of Northwest lore. This item however, was for display only, part of the proprietor’s collection. Changing Vancouver covers the building’s story here; the building only lasted for about 10 years on account of poor quality bricks. Film footage of the station survives in the 1907 film by William Harbeck which you can learn much more about in the City Reflections DVD. Thanks for the photo, Derek!

SS Princess Mary 1958 placemat on Flickr. Technically, this is a special Illustrated Victoria feature, starring the former CPR steamship, the SS Princess Mary. From wikipedia:

On March 14, 1911, the Princess Mary made her first trip on the Nanaimo-Comox-Vancouver service.

Among the highlights of Princess Mary’s service was February 15, 1915 when the 30th Battalion of the Canadian Expeditionary Force (CEF) embarked from Victoria, British Columbia sailing to the War in Europe…

She may have lived the end of her life as a restaurant in downtown Victoria, but this 1915 W.J. Moore panoramic photograph at Pier D in Vancouver by brings back the romance of the era. The end of the line for the restaurant is documented in this online thread. And speaking of nautical themed restaurants, many Vancouverites will fondly remember the North Vancouver Ferry # 5 Seven Seas Restaurant. I salvaged something of a historical gemstone last year when I uncovered a videotape featuring a full tour of the Seven Seas Restaurant at the end of its life. Stay tuned; I hope to post it on YouTube some day soon…

Main Diversion Entrance, Stanley Park, Vancouver, Canada; vintage transferware souvenir of Stanley Park from Gray’s Pottery in Stoke-on-Trent, England via ebay. Gray’s Pottery operated from 1907 to 1962, when it was sold and became Portmeirion Pottery. The image appears to be based on the postcard seen here, which might be from the 1930s, based on the era of the vehicles.

The entranceway to Stanley Park was reconfigured in 1926 to create the pedestrian promenade seen here. Designed by sculptor Charles Marega, the walkway was constructed with concrete mixed with sea sand, sadly resulting in a deteriorating, unsalvageable structure.

A Birks pin, 2.5” long, showing a key to the city of Vancouver, inscribed with the words Vancouver & Dist. LBA (Lawn Bowling Association, apparently). Courtesy of Neil Whaley.

A Birks pin, 2.5” long, showing a key to the city of Vancouver, inscribed with the words Vancouver & Dist. LBA (Lawn Bowling Association, apparently). Courtesy of Neil Whaley.

A fantastic souvenir knife for the CPR showing the steamship docks, “the Sleeping Beauty” (Crown Mountain) from Stanley Park (which may be based on this postcard), and the Empress. Exactly which Empress steamship is undetermined. From the item description:

This is a great early souvenir knife from Canada. It has great scales with different images on both sides. The knife was made by Griffon from Germany. The image of the Empress ship that was owned by the Canadian Pacific Railway is great. The Empress of Ireland sank in 1914 killing 1012 people, and became the deadliest Maritime disaster in Canadian history. The blades have never been sharpened and are tight with great snap. This knife measures 3-1/16” long when closed.

A bit more about Griffon Cutlery Works from the web:

The Griffon Cutlery Works was founded in 1888 by Albert L. Silberstein (1866-?)…Originally located on Broadway (until around 1915), then at 74-76 Fifth Avenue, they moved into [a] building on West 19th Street in 1920 and remained [t]here until 1968. They also had a factory and branch outlet in Solingen, Germany.

The CPR actually had 16 steamships with the “Empress” moniker, about half of which saw service in the Pacific (the other half traversed the Atlantic). These ships included the Empress of Asia, Australia, Britain, Canada, China, France, India, Ireland, Japan, Russia, and Scotland. You can probably guess which ships sailed in the Pacific and which were in the Atlantic based on their names.

According to wikipedia & the web, here are the ships of the Pacific: Empress of Asia, Australia, China, India, Japan, and Russia. And these ships sailed the Atlantic: Empress of Britain, Canada, France, Ireland, and Scotland (though the second ship to bear the name Empress of Scotland was actually the Empress of Japan before 1942).

We can try to deduce which Empress is depicted on the knife if we narrow down the number of Pacific ships with just two smoke stacks. Process of elimination leaves the Empress of China, India, or Japan, but to confuse things further, there were more than one vessel using each one of these names. Actually, I think this image depicts TWO ships, with just tail end of the second ship at the right. Determined nautical enthusiasts might be able to make a more precise response, and a special prize goes to anyone who locates a photograph of the same image. 

For the discerning collector, this knife is available for the prestigious price of $99 on ebay from seller combolox, with $32.90 shipping to Canada.

Sculpted souvenir plate of Vancouver, undated, signed “S:C” just above the BC. Initially carved in wood, this item is made from faux wood known as “Syroco”, a term applied to a molded material resembling carved wood. This process was invented and first implemented by the Syracuse Ornamental Company. Via Syracuse University:

Founded in Syracuse, New York in 1890 by immigrant Adolph Holstein, the Syracuse Ornamental Company (Syroco) specialized in decorative wood carving, especially for the local residential market. Products included fireplace mantelpieces and other types of interior decoration popular in late Victorian homes. To meet increasing market demand and sales opportunities Holstein developed a material looked and felt like wood but that which could be shaped, allowing multiple pieces to be produced through a molding process. The new product, which combined wood pulp brought from the Adirondacks with flour as a binder and other materials to give it strength, was extruded and then cut to fit compression molds, which had were made from original carvings in real wood…

In 1965 the company was bought by Rexall Drug and Chemical Company (which soon changed its name to Dart Industries). Dart owned Tupperware, from which Syroco gained more knowledge of injection molding. Syroco was purchased by the Syratech Corporation of Boston in 1986 which expanded its patio furniture production. In 1995 Syratech sold Syroco to Marley PLC of Sevenoaks, England, and in 2004 Syroco was purchased by Vassallo Industries of Puerto Rico which closed the plant in 2007…

In addition to showing the Bloedel Conservatory, the Gastown Clock, a Kwakiutl Totem Pole, Lions Gate Bridge, and a BC Ferry, it also features the Royal Hudson steam locomotive. From wikipedia:

The locomotive was restored by Robert E. Swanson’s Railway Appliance Research Ltd. team and the staff of the CPR Drake Street roundhouse shops beginning on 25 November 1973 and then operated by the British Columbia Department of Travel Industry with the cooperation of the British Columbia Railway. The BCR commenced a Royal Hudson excursion service between North Vancouver and Squamish on 20 June 1974. By the end of the 1974 tourist season, 47,295 passengers had been carried and the excursion was deemed successful. It was the only regularly scheduled steam excursion over mainline trackage in North America. The excursion operated between May and October, from Wednesday through Saturday. It also traveled North America in the late 1970s as a promotion for BC tourism. It quickly became one of British Columbia’s main tourist attractions and an icon of Canadian steam power.

The buildings in the city skyline probably give us the best clues when this souvenir plate was created. The three tallest buildings appear to be depicting the Royal Bank Tower (1973), the TD Tower (1972), and the Scotia Tower (1977). By lining up the Hotel Vancouver with the towers and zooming out in Google Earth, it would appear this view was taken from one of the higher floors in the Frank Stanzl Building (1974) on Broadway, a brutalist building designed by Vladimir Plavsic. As an aside, Lindsay Brown’s post on the Stanzl Building is highly recommended.

After all this, I still can’t be certain when this thing was made, but it was probably some time post-1977; possibly even post-1986 if the S:C stands for Syratech Corporation. Who knew you could learn all this from an old souvenir!

The Lions tote bag by ECUAD grad Liz Toohey-Wiese, available at Collage Collage on Main Street, where they write:

We love Liz. A local artist, an instructor here at the store - her work is very Vancouver, and very awesome. Carry this view of the lions (a most distinctive mountain range here in Vancouver) around with you were ever you go on this sweet little tote.

Click the image for more details. 
Liz has been seen here on Illustrated Vancouver once before on December 13, 2010, not long after the ECUAD student sale the month prior. I liked her paintings so much I bought one shortly after that sale! Which is another good reminder to all - this weekend is the ECUAD student sale, starting Friday at noon!

The Lions tote bag by ECUAD grad Liz Toohey-Wiese, available at Collage Collage on Main Street, where they write:

We love Liz. A local artist, an instructor here at the store - her work is very Vancouver, and very awesome. Carry this view of the lions (a most distinctive mountain range here in Vancouver) around with you were ever you go on this sweet little tote.

Click the image for more details.

Liz has been seen here on Illustrated Vancouver once before on December 13, 2010, not long after the ECUAD student sale the month prior. I liked her paintings so much I bought one shortly after that sale! Which is another good reminder to all - this weekend is the ECUAD student sale, starting Friday at noon!

In honour of Remembrance Day, I present to you a Vancouver Peace Celebration souvenir program with cover illustration by Paul Page. This program was printed very shortly after the Treaty of Versailles was signed (June 28, 1919), though fighting in WWI ceased the year prior at 11 am on November 11, 1918, when Germany signed the Armistice of Compiègne.

The fact that there is not just one but four dates printed on this program seems to convey a great desire to celebrate the end of the war. These dates were July 6 & 19 and August 3-4, 1919. You might recall that WWI began with the assassination of Archduke Franz Ferdinand of Austria on June 28, 1914; August 3, 1914 was the day that Germany declared war on France and Belgium, and August 4, 1914 was the day that Britain declared war on Germany. November 11 was specifically dedicated as Remembrance Day by King George V on November 7, 1919.

The winged angel descending from heaven in this illustration might remind you of the bronze Angel of Victory by sculptor Coeur de Lion MacCarthy, as seen in front of Waterfront Station. However, this drawing came as early as two years before the monument. From the City of Vancouver public art registry:

A heritage monument, this bronze figurative sculpture depicts an angel carrying a dead soldier and commemorates those who lost their lives in World War I. This is one of three identical statues commissioned by the Canadian Pacific Railway in 1921 to honour their workers who answered the call of “king and country” and made the ultimate sacrifice. The others are in Winnipeg and Montreal. The angel originally held a full wreath in her upraised hand. After WW II, the dates of that war were also added to the plaque.

Artist Statement: The artist won the CPR commission from a nation-wide competition.

This classical bronze monument made the Heritage Vancouver Society’s Top 10 Endangered List in 2009. I don’t know if there are imminent plans to restore the angel’s crown, though I think the monument in Winnipeg is also missing a crown. By contrast, the monument in Montreal is in remarkable condition, as it is stored indoors at Windsor Station.

While the angel in the sculpture carries a dead soldier, in the drawing, the angel carries a shield which reads, “DECVS ET TVTAMEN”, or rather, “decus et tutamen”. Again thanks to wikipedia, I can provide the Latin translation/explanation: 

DECUS ET TUTAMEN is the motto of a British Army cavalry regiment, later artillery - The Essex Yeomanry, established in 1794. The motto was confirmed by King Edward VII in 1909 when it was added to a regimental guidon (or colours) presented to the Essex Yeomanry regiment by the King. The definitions are: “decus” - shield, virtue, honour or glory; and “tutamen” - defence or protection, thus the meaning is said to be: “shield and protection” or “honour and defence”, etc.

Paul Page’s distinctive signature with the circled P (much like the ® character) can be seen in the bottom right. His name doesn’t ring any immediate bells with me, but I am very curious if anyone has ever seen this signature before.

Page has captured a city skyline with the following recognizable rooftops: Wesley Methodist Church at the corner of Burrard and Georgia (demolished), the Hotel Vancouver #2 (demolished), the Sinclair Centre, the Vancouver Block, the Dominion Building, and the Sun Tower, then known as the World Building. 

The next time you walk past the Angel of Victory at Waterfront Station, pause for  a moment to reflect on those who have made the ultimate sacrifice for peace.

I’d like to thank Neil Whaley for sharing the souvenir peace program, pkdon50 for the CC photo, and Jeremy Hood for permission to reprint his photo montage.

Cross-posted to VancouverIsAwesome.

Happy 85th Birthday to the Orpheum, or rather, the NEW Orpheum! Last night I attended the 85th birthday celebration with the live orchestra playing along to Charlie Chaplin’s City Lights. One piece of breaking news—the Orpheum now has a new permanent addition—a 35mm film projector has been installed in the theatre, courtesy of a local film collector!

This souvenir program is dated 1916, and was for the OLD Orpheum, which is no more. From wikipedia:

the old Orpheum, at 761 Granville Street, was renamed the Vancouver Theatre (later the Lyric, then the International Cinema, then the Lyric once more before it closed for demolition in 1969 to make way for the first phase of the Pacific Centre project)

The cover illustration depicting a woman looking at the city skyline from North Vancouver, which I think might be a reference to Pauline Johnson who had just passed away 3 years prior. The drawing was signed “W. McCreery, Van, BC, ‘16”. The name McCreery appears in Early Vancouver Vol 2 circa the 1890s:

Possibly about two or three years later I helped to build the McCreery house on Pacific Street for $3 per day,” (now site of Tudor Manor) “one of the first I think in that locality. Horrobin and Holden were contractors, Fripp architect…

The back cover of the program features a classic ad from A. H. Timms, Printers, the company that early Vancouver photographer Philip Timms worked for. The program itself, shown courtesy of Neil Whaley.

Vintage Capilano Suspension Bridge, a decal for sale on eBay, but ironically, shipping not available to Canada.

Vintage Capilano Suspension Bridge, a decal for sale on eBay, but ironically, shipping not available to Canada.

Imagery from the exhibition Made in BC; Home-grown Design at ECUAD. This exhibition was based on the BC150 Applied Arts Project from 2008 and it toured across the Province, including a stop at North Vancouver’s Presentation House from November 26, 2011 to May 2012. It was on display at Emily Carr from August 5 - 25, 2012.

I’m sorry I couldn’t tip you off earlier about this, but perhaps you were already informed by Scout Magazine or the Georgia Straight. The show was co-curated by Sam Carter and Patrick Gunn, with assistance from a host of other individuals and organizations. And what a fantastic show it was! In case you missed it, here was the introduction to the exhibition:

Diverse functional two and three-dimensional objects represented in this travelling exhibition reflect phases of design, creativity and innovation in BC, from the earliest to most recent residents.

The working definition of BC Design for this project is “created by any person born or residing in BC”.  Included are designs produced and manufactured outside of BC, designed/styled by BC born, or residents of BC.  Both vernacular (popular-folk designs) and works created by professional graphic and industrial designers are included in the exhibition.

Designs created and made by BC farmers, tinkerers, engineers, architects, printers, clothiers, jewelers, glass makers, potters, guild-craftspeople and other makers, including design professionals of recent decades illustrate Made in BC: Home-Grown Design.

From the origins of Vancouver School of Decorative and Applied Arts in 1925, today’s Emily Carr University of Art and Design’s students, faculty, staff and administrators have contributed greatly to the history of BC design.  

Co-curated by Professor Emeritus Sam Carter and alumnus Patrick Gunn, this teaching collection is inspired by the University’s online course, BC Design History. Visit the BC150 Applied Arts for additional information.

There are all sorts of gems in this exhibit. Take for example, the great use of large scale banners in the exhibit; I’ve shown the branding and beer label banners, which I have a personal affinity towards. Especially rare is the Non-Tox Beer from Silver Spring Brewery Ltd. in Victoria, BC; see my restored beer label of the same beer, brewed by Westminster Breweries in New West. The exhibit recognizes many of the recurring themes that I’ve discovered here at Illustrated Vancouver; the popular genres of restaurant menus, luggage labels, fairs & exhibitions, and streetscapes & bridges to name a few. Congratulations are in order for Sam Carter and Patrick Gunn; great work on this show!

Theatre Under the Stars at the Malkin Bowl, Stanley Park, the 1945 souvenir program with offset lithograph by artist unknown. About the Malkin Bowl, from wikipedia:

The Marion Malkin Memorial Bowl, or Malkin Bowl, is an outdoor theatre in Stanley Park, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada. Built in 1934, it was originally a two-thirds-size replica of the Hollywood Bowl. Allard de Ridder, then conductor of the Vancouver Symphony Orchestra, was largely responsible for convincing W. H. Malkin, a former mayor of Vancouver, to build the theatre as a summer concert venue for the VSO. Malkin endowed the theatre in memory of his wife.

From the Theatre Under the Stars website:
In 1940, Theatre Under the Stars started when a group of local theatre people formed to produce professional quality musicals during the summer. Since then, TUTS has been a Lower Mainland tradition, delighting generations of locals and tourists alike under the stars in the pastoral outdoor setting of historic Malkin Bowl in Stanley Park…Theatre Under the Stars (TUTS) produced operettas and musicals 1940-63 at the Malkin Bowl. The original TUTS was founded under the auspices of the Vancouver Park Board by board superintendent A.S. Wootten, conductor Basil Horsfall and actor E.V. Young, with advice from Gordon Hilker, to provide entertainment in Stanley Park in Malkin Bowl, which was a band shell for summer concerts. In the 1930s attempts had been made by Young and Stanley Bligh to establish outdoor theatre at Brockton Oval, and these ventures set the precedent for TUTS. After TUTS’ first season (which opened 6 Aug 1940 and presented The Geisha, the plays A Midsummer Night’s Dream and As You Like It, and selections from grand opera), its program was devoted mainly to operettas (The Firefly, Rose Marie, The Red Mill, Naughty Marietta and others)…Plagued by bad weather and facing competition from the Vancouver International Festival, TUTS declared bankruptcy in 1963. In its 24 summers, the original TUTS had contributed greatly to the Vancouver scene and assisted significantly in the development of many performers’ careers. Then in 1969 a new theatre company, Theatre in the Park, began presenting two musicals a season. The company renamed itself to Theatre Under the Stars in 1980. In 1982 a fire destroyed part of Malkin Bowl but the company was able to survive and rebuild the damaged outdoor theatre and continued presenting musical theatre through to 2006, when Theatre Under the Stars took a season off to regroup then returned in 2007 presenting Oklahoma! and Grease to sell-out crowds…
The Vancouver International Festival, in case you’re curious, survived for 11 seasons, with 1968 being the last. By comparison, the Folk Festival first appeared in 1978. It was 14 years later that the Vancouver International Film Festival came to town in 1982. And the Fringe Festival appeared a year later, when the First Vancouver Theatrespace Society (FVTS) formed in 1983. 

Theatre Under the Stars at the Malkin Bowl, Stanley Park, the 1945 souvenir program with offset lithograph by artist unknown. About the Malkin Bowl, from wikipedia:

The Marion Malkin Memorial Bowl, or Malkin Bowl, is an outdoor theatre in Stanley Park, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada. Built in 1934, it was originally a two-thirds-size replica of the Hollywood Bowl. Allard de Ridder, then conductor of the Vancouver Symphony Orchestra, was largely responsible for convincing W. H. Malkin, a former mayor of Vancouver, to build the theatre as a summer concert venue for the VSO. Malkin endowed the theatre in memory of his wife.

From the Theatre Under the Stars website:

In 1940, Theatre Under the Stars started when a group of local theatre people formed to produce professional quality musicals during the summer. Since then, TUTS has been a Lower Mainland tradition, delighting generations of locals and tourists alike under the stars in the pastoral outdoor setting of historic Malkin Bowl in Stanley Park…

Theatre Under the Stars (TUTS) produced operettas and musicals 1940-63 at the Malkin Bowl. The original TUTS was founded under the auspices of the Vancouver Park Board by board superintendent A.S. Wootten, conductor Basil Horsfall and actor E.V. Young, with advice from Gordon Hilker, to provide entertainment in Stanley Park in Malkin Bowl, which was a band shell for summer concerts. In the 1930s attempts had been made by Young and Stanley Bligh to establish outdoor theatre at Brockton Oval, and these ventures set the precedent for TUTS. After TUTS’ first season (which opened 6 Aug 1940 and presented The Geisha, the plays A Midsummer Night’s Dream and As You Like It, and selections from grand opera), its program was devoted mainly to operettas (The Firefly, Rose Marie, The Red Mill, Naughty Marietta and others)…

Plagued by bad weather and facing competition from the Vancouver International Festival, TUTS declared bankruptcy in 1963. In its 24 summers, the original TUTS had contributed greatly to the Vancouver scene and assisted significantly in the development of many performers’ careers. Then in 1969 a new theatre company, Theatre in the Park, began presenting two musicals a season. The company renamed itself to Theatre Under the Stars in 1980. In 1982 a fire destroyed part of Malkin Bowl but the company was able to survive and rebuild the damaged outdoor theatre and continued presenting musical theatre through to 2006, when Theatre Under the Stars took a season off to regroup then returned in 2007 presenting Oklahoma! and Grease to sell-out crowds…

The Vancouver International Festival, in case you’re curious, survived for 11 seasons, with 1968 being the last. By comparison, the Folk Festival first appeared in 1978. It was 14 years later that the Vancouver International Film Festival came to town in 1982. And the Fringe Festival appeared a year later, when the First Vancouver Theatrespace Society (FVTS) formed in 1983. 

A followup post in honour of "I Love Transit" week, here’s the Seabus in ORANGE on a tea towel, currently on eBay from a collector in SW Ontario. With all the green and red, this would look great at Christmas time!

Limited Edition Expo 86 "World in Motion - World in Touch" plate seen on eBay. I’ve featured a cluster of souvenir plates previously but I haven’t seen this one before. I don’t know how rare it actually is (there are at least 348 of them) and I don’t know how many folks would care enough to purchase something like this, but it does show off the transportation theme nicely with a SkyTrain, Seabus, Monorail, AND Canadarm, no less! But no artist credit noted.