Sketches of Vancouver by Jo Scott-B, a sketchbook, revisiting Neighbourhoods walked with John Atkin.

Sketches of Vancouver by Jo Scott-B, a sketchbook, revisiting Neighbourhoods walked with John Atkin.

Hycroft by Michael Kluckner, painted for the University Women’s Club which has owned the building for the past half-century. The plaque states the work was donated by Lois Millington in honour of Hycroft’s 100th Anniversary March 2011. Michael writes on his site:


A good party and happy conclusion to a process that began last September with me getting onto the roof of a highrise a few blocks away with a 30 x 36 inch canvas…Normally when you’re painting or photographing architecture you look for a low, corner angle that gives the composition strong diagonals and more drama; this straight-on view is much calmer, more conservative, befitting a mansion so well established in its landscape. The space has to recede in subtle shifts of tone and scale without any tricks of perspective.

Hycroft by Michael Kluckner, painted for the University Women’s Club which has owned the building for the past half-century. The plaque states the work was donated by Lois Millington in honour of Hycroft’s 100th Anniversary March 2011.

Michael writes on his site:

A good party and happy conclusion to a process that began last September with me getting onto the roof of a highrise a few blocks away with a 30 x 36 inch canvas…

Normally when you’re painting or photographing architecture you look for a low, corner angle that gives the composition strong diagonals and more drama; this straight-on view is much calmer, more conservative, befitting a mansion so well established in its landscape. The space has to recede in subtle shifts of tone and scale without any tricks of perspective.

Proposal for the VanDusen Botanical Garden, by artist unknown, seen in BC Motorist Magazine, September/October 1966.

This artist’s conception shows the botanical garden which has been proposed for the 67-acre site on Old Shaughnessy Golf Course between 33rd and 37th Avenues and Oak and Granville Streets in Vancouver. Almost the same size as the famous Royal Botanic Garden of Edinburgh, the site is naturally endowed for the growing of large collections of plants indigenous to temperate zones. Dr. Harold R. Fletcher, Regius Keeper of the Edinburgh Garden and a world authority on botanical gardens, has expressed great enthusiasm for the British Columbia project. On his visit to survey the site, he spoke to the Vancouver Board of Trade, the Board of Parks and Public Recreation, members of City Council, Vancouver Garden Club, Vancouver Rotary Club and Save Our Parkland Association. Dr. Fletcher said that Vancouver’s environment and climate were ideal for the growth of plant life and that the botanical garden could become the focal point of horticultural beauty and development for all of mainland British Columbia. The groups of plants, grown for scientific study, would be outstanding as colorful showpieces and would attract countless citizens and tourists, he said. To promote the project a new organization has been formed, the Botanical Gardens Association with offices at 201, 1111 W. Georgia St., Vancouver, which is asking the federal, provincial and civic governments each to assume one quarter the price of the land and the balance to be raised from the public.

When the CPR owned property was vacated by the Shaughnessy Golf Club in 1960, the railway proposed a subdivision development which was strongly opposed by local citizens. More from vandusengarden.org:

In 1966, the VanDusen Botanical Garden Association was formed to assist the Vancouver Park Board with saving the site. This effort was successful and the land was purchased with shared funding from the City of Vancouver, the Government of British Columbia and the Vancouver Foundation with a donation by W. J. VanDusen, after whom the Garden was named.
Development started in 1971 and VanDusen Botanical Garden officially opened to the public on August 30, 1975.
Landscape development was under the direction of W. C. Livingstone from 1971 to 1976. Curator Roy Forster managed the Garden and was responsible for much of the planting design from 1977 to 1996.

Proposal for the VanDusen Botanical Garden, by artist unknown, seen in BC Motorist Magazine, September/October 1966.

This artist’s conception shows the botanical garden which has been proposed for the 67-acre site on Old Shaughnessy Golf Course between 33rd and 37th Avenues and Oak and Granville Streets in Vancouver. Almost the same size as the famous Royal Botanic Garden of Edinburgh, the site is naturally endowed for the growing of large collections of plants indigenous to temperate zones. Dr. Harold R. Fletcher, Regius Keeper of the Edinburgh Garden and a world authority on botanical gardens, has expressed great enthusiasm for the British Columbia project. On his visit to survey the site, he spoke to the Vancouver Board of Trade, the Board of Parks and Public Recreation, members of City Council, Vancouver Garden Club, Vancouver Rotary Club and Save Our Parkland Association. Dr. Fletcher said that Vancouver’s environment and climate were ideal for the growth of plant life and that the botanical garden could become the focal point of horticultural beauty and development for all of mainland British Columbia. The groups of plants, grown for scientific study, would be outstanding as colorful showpieces and would attract countless citizens and tourists, he said. To promote the project a new organization has been formed, the Botanical Gardens Association with offices at 201, 1111 W. Georgia St., Vancouver, which is asking the federal, provincial and civic governments each to assume one quarter the price of the land and the balance to be raised from the public.

When the CPR owned property was vacated by the Shaughnessy Golf Club in 1960, the railway proposed a subdivision development which was strongly opposed by local citizens. More from vandusengarden.org:

In 1966, the VanDusen Botanical Garden Association was formed to assist the Vancouver Park Board with saving the site. This effort was successful and the land was purchased with shared funding from the City of Vancouver, the Government of British Columbia and the Vancouver Foundation with a donation by W. J. VanDusen, after whom the Garden was named.

Development started in 1971 and VanDusen Botanical Garden officially opened to the public on August 30, 1975.

Landscape development was under the direction of W. C. Livingstone from 1971 to 1976. Curator Roy Forster managed the Garden and was responsible for much of the planting design from 1977 to 1996.