Sublime; a mixed media group exhibition at the Ferry Building in West Vancouver with Charles Keillor, Thom Kline, and Rich Rawling. The show opened last week and runs until this coming Sunday, February 23, 2014 in the Ferry Building Gallery, at 1414 Argyle Avenue in Ambleside, West Vancouver. The gallery is open free to the public from 11 am to 5 pm Tuesdays through Sundays.

Seen here is a graphite work by Charles Keillor, showing North Vancouver’s Lynnwood Inn just after it closed for good in 2012, and Watchful Lion 3, a watercolour painting by Rich Rawling, who writes: 

I was weaving my cruiser bike back to the North Shore after a sketching session at Stanley Park’s Second Beach. As I popped out of the forest at the top of the Causeway there they were. Those lions were looking hungry. But instead of sacrificing my carcass to them I took a few photos in the raking afternoon light realizing that these Art Deco masterpieces would be the basis for a few watercolours. I tip my hat to the sculptor who designed the statues…
The sculptor/designer of the Lions was of course, Charles Marega, a most handsome portrait of whom can be seen here, posing with his creation.
The Sun Princess by North Vancouver artist Keith Campbell. This painting was commissioned in 1994 by the father of the current proprietor of the Peg General Store on Commercial Drive. The Peg shopkeeper reminisced how his father used to live at International Plaza in North Vancouver with a great view of the Lions Gate Bridge. When he moved up to Lynn Valley, he missed seeing the ships coming in and out of the Burrard Inlet, so he commissioned this painting! I cannot find any biographical information about Keith Campbell, but perhaps this is him? Any additional comments would be appreciated!
This is a particularly nostalgic view, depicting the ship known as the Sun Princess circa 1974-1988. Originally built as the Spirit of London wikipedia tells us it was an Italian built cruise ship put into service in 1972. More lore from wikipedia: 

The ship appeared in the 1975 Columbo episode “Troubled Waters”, guest starring Robert Vaughn, as well as in Herbie Goes Bananas (1980). She was also featured in at least one episode of The Love Boat involving a competition between Captain Stubing of the Pacific Princess and the captain of the Sun Princess.

The current ship named the Sun Princess also built in Italy had her maiden voyage on December 2, 1995. Thanks to the Peg General Store for this great nautical gem! ps: the painting is available for sale!

The Sun Princess by North Vancouver artist Keith Campbell. This painting was commissioned in 1994 by the father of the current proprietor of the Peg General Store on Commercial Drive. The Peg shopkeeper reminisced how his father used to live at International Plaza in North Vancouver with a great view of the Lions Gate Bridge. When he moved up to Lynn Valley, he missed seeing the ships coming in and out of the Burrard Inlet, so he commissioned this painting! I cannot find any biographical information about Keith Campbell, but perhaps this is him? Any additional comments would be appreciated!

This is a particularly nostalgic view, depicting the ship known as the Sun Princess circa 1974-1988. Originally built as the Spirit of London wikipedia tells us it was an Italian built cruise ship put into service in 1972. More lore from wikipedia: 

The ship appeared in the 1975 Columbo episode “Troubled Waters”, guest starring Robert Vaughn, as well as in Herbie Goes Bananas (1980). She was also featured in at least one episode of The Love Boat involving a competition between Captain Stubing of the Pacific Princess and the captain of the Sun Princess.

The current ship named the Sun Princess also built in Italy had her maiden voyage on December 2, 1995. Thanks to the Peg General Store for this great nautical gem! ps: the painting is available for sale!

Along the Banks of Lynn Creek, a tribute to Frederick Varley painted by Neil Macdonald, 2012, photo redux by me, tour this past weekend thanks to DaveO! Neil Macdonald’s paintings are on exhibit in the Lynn Valley Main Library until January 29, 2013. From the show description:


Neil grew up in East Vancouver in the fifties. He first discovered Lynn Valley as a child when he and his friends would venture across the old second narrows bridge on their bikes, park them at Menzie’s Store on Keith Road, and then hike into the spectacular watershed of Lynn Creek. 
As a married adult, Neil was thrilled to purchase waterfront property on Lynn Creek, a place with so many fond childhood memories. He designed and built a home and art studio located down the road from an original member of the Group of Seven, Frederick H. Varley. Excited to live where many of Varley’s paintings were created, and to view the same inspirational scenery as Varley, Neil was motivated to create his first series of paintings in 1986. 
 It has been nearly two decades since Neil lived in his first home on Lynn Creek, but a recent visit back to Lynn Canyon re-inspired him to create a new body of work about it. Through a palette containing the cool turquoises of water, the mossy greens of  rocks and the rich dark colours the forest canopy, he has captured the pristine beauty of the canyon in this new exhibition. His watercolour and acrylic paintings are a tribute to F.H. Varley, and celebrate the inspiration and wealth of imagery they both found in Lynn Valley.

Along the Banks of Lynn Creek, a tribute to Frederick Varley painted by Neil Macdonald, 2012, photo redux by me, tour this past weekend thanks to DaveO! Neil Macdonald’s paintings are on exhibit in the Lynn Valley Main Library until January 29, 2013. From the show description:

Neil grew up in East Vancouver in the fifties. He first discovered Lynn Valley as a child when he and his friends would venture across the old second narrows bridge on their bikes, park them at Menzie’s Store on Keith Road, and then hike into the spectacular watershed of Lynn Creek.

As a married adult, Neil was thrilled to purchase waterfront property on Lynn Creek, a place with so many fond childhood memories. He designed and built a home and art studio located down the road from an original member of the Group of Seven, Frederick H. Varley. Excited to live where many of Varley’s paintings were created, and to view the same inspirational scenery as Varley, Neil was motivated to create his first series of paintings in 1986.

 It has been nearly two decades since Neil lived in his first home on Lynn Creek, but a recent visit back to Lynn Canyon re-inspired him to create a new body of work about it. Through a palette containing the cool turquoises of water, the mossy greens of  rocks and the rich dark colours the forest canopy, he has captured the pristine beauty of the canyon in this new exhibition. His watercolour and acrylic paintings are a tribute to F.H. Varley, and celebrate the inspiration and wealth of imagery they both found in Lynn Valley.

Driveway, 2012 by John Ogilvy offers a dramatic perspective in this 40”x50” oil on canvas, currently on exhibit at the Ian Tan Gallery until November 29th. AND THE CRAWL STARTS TODAY!

Driveway, 2012 by John Ogilvy offers a dramatic perspective in this 40”x50” oil on canvas, currently on exhibit at the Ian Tan Gallery until November 29th. AND THE CRAWL STARTS TODAY!

Vintage Capilano Suspension Bridge, a decal for sale on eBay, but ironically, shipping not available to Canada.

Vintage Capilano Suspension Bridge, a decal for sale on eBay, but ironically, shipping not available to Canada.

translinked:

Third and St. Davids, a comic cell by legendary underground cartoonist Rand Holmes, as seen in the 1980 BCIT Almanac, under the Public Transit section. Third and St. David’s is the alternate name of the destination sign which has been used on the Southbound 228 Lonsdale Quay bus in North Vancouver, as well as the N24. Here is a transcription of the section, a great snapshot of the transit zeitgeist of the early 1980s, written by Michael Kluckner:

Millions of dollars have been spent in Vancouver over the last decade, not on the creation of a rapid transit service, but on expensive consultants’ reports on whether and what to do about it. Meanwhile, the streets get more and more crowded, the quality of life diminishes and the ticky-tacky suburbs—all served exclusively be the automobile—continue their march through farmland out over the horizon. This is progress?
Anyway, what passes for public transit is the bus system, basically the same system which has existed since the street-car rails were ripped up and the old “Toonerville Trolley” commuter railroad was discontinued some 25 years ago. The system is run by the Metro Transit Operating Company, a child spawned of B.C. Hydro with a couple of layers of regional bureaucracy dumped in between the bus drivers and the passengers.
The former NDP Government (1972-75), being believers in all-things-public, injected some money into the system during their term of office, bought some shiny new buses, painted the word “Bus” on the sides of most of them, and extended the service out into the boondocks including a commuter “Fastbus” service from most of the municipalities ringing Vancouver. The current government, and the current B.C. Hydro chairman (former Socred attorney-general Robert Bonner, the arch-foe of most things profitless and sensible), have alternately cut the service, expressed faith in it, and promised prompt and speedy action on rapid transit by 1984 or so.
Which leaves passengers waiting at the bus stop in the rain, usually.
The bus system is good, if you work downtown and are commuting during the normal rush hour from not too far away. Downtown congestion and parking rates are outrageous, so the bus system wins by default. It is convenient and cheap.
BCIT, in case you haven’t already noticed, is not downtown. It is in the suburbs, and unless you live along Willingdon, Hastings or Kingsway, it will take you a long time to get to school in the morning.
The Student Association is acting as a dealer for Hydro’s $18.50 per month student bus passes, available through the This & That Emporium, again this year. The pass is really a bargain, when you consider paying a dollar for any round trip and the inconvenience of always having the correct change.
Bus schedules and route maps are available in the Housing Office in the Maquinna Residence. If they don’t have the one you want or you are trying to figure out how to get somewhere you’ve never been, call B.C. Hydro’s Transit Information number and ask for directions. They will give you a very detailed route to follow, including bus numbers, transfer points and the time to catch the first bus in order to make your destination on time. A very worthwhile service.
In all fairness, B.C. Hydro is responsible for one of the great scenic bargains in the city—the 50¢ Seabus from the foot of Lonsdale in North Vancouver to downtown. It’s a great way to see the harbor and mountains on a clear winter day.


Michael added some interesting comments as an addendum:

About a year or so after I wrote that piece, I had obtained an ongoing gig at CKVU on the Vancouver Show with Bob Spence, doing a program called “Between the Streets,” which explored areas of the city and compared what was there with old photos — it was what really got me going as a ‘historian’ and led me into doing the big serious city history books.

translinked:

Third and St. Davids, a comic cell by legendary underground cartoonist Rand Holmes, as seen in the 1980 BCIT Almanac, under the Public Transit section. Third and St. David’s is the alternate name of the destination sign which has been used on the Southbound 228 Lonsdale Quay bus in North Vancouver, as well as the N24. Here is a transcription of the section, a great snapshot of the transit zeitgeist of the early 1980s, written by Michael Kluckner:

Millions of dollars have been spent in Vancouver over the last decade, not on the creation of a rapid transit service, but on expensive consultants’ reports on whether and what to do about it. Meanwhile, the streets get more and more crowded, the quality of life diminishes and the ticky-tacky suburbs—all served exclusively be the automobile—continue their march through farmland out over the horizon. This is progress?

Anyway, what passes for public transit is the bus system, basically the same system which has existed since the street-car rails were ripped up and the old “Toonerville Trolley” commuter railroad was discontinued some 25 years ago. The system is run by the Metro Transit Operating Company, a child spawned of B.C. Hydro with a couple of layers of regional bureaucracy dumped in between the bus drivers and the passengers.

The former NDP Government (1972-75), being believers in all-things-public, injected some money into the system during their term of office, bought some shiny new buses, painted the word “Bus” on the sides of most of them, and extended the service out into the boondocks including a commuter “Fastbus” service from most of the municipalities ringing Vancouver. The current government, and the current B.C. Hydro chairman (former Socred attorney-general Robert Bonner, the arch-foe of most things profitless and sensible), have alternately cut the service, expressed faith in it, and promised prompt and speedy action on rapid transit by 1984 or so.

Which leaves passengers waiting at the bus stop in the rain, usually.

The bus system is good, if you work downtown and are commuting during the normal rush hour from not too far away. Downtown congestion and parking rates are outrageous, so the bus system wins by default. It is convenient and cheap.

BCIT, in case you haven’t already noticed, is not downtown. It is in the suburbs, and unless you live along Willingdon, Hastings or Kingsway, it will take you a long time to get to school in the morning.

The Student Association is acting as a dealer for Hydro’s $18.50 per month student bus passes, available through the This & That Emporium, again this year. The pass is really a bargain, when you consider paying a dollar for any round trip and the inconvenience of always having the correct change.

Bus schedules and route maps are available in the Housing Office in the Maquinna Residence. If they don’t have the one you want or you are trying to figure out how to get somewhere you’ve never been, call B.C. Hydro’s Transit Information number and ask for directions. They will give you a very detailed route to follow, including bus numbers, transfer points and the time to catch the first bus in order to make your destination on time. A very worthwhile service.

In all fairness, B.C. Hydro is responsible for one of the great scenic bargains in the city—the 50¢ Seabus from the foot of Lonsdale in North Vancouver to downtown. It’s a great way to see the harbor and mountains on a clear winter day.

Michael added some interesting comments as an addendum:

About a year or so after I wrote that piece, I had obtained an ongoing gig at CKVU on the Vancouver Show with Bob Spence, doing a program called “Between the Streets,” which explored areas of the city and compared what was there with old photos — it was what really got me going as a ‘historian’ and led me into doing the big serious city history books.