The Importance of Being Earnest, a UBC Theatre playbill by Ernest Le Messurier, cartoonist and commercial artist, from the Ernest Le Messurier Comic Collection in the Vancouver Archives, 76-32 #121. Ernest was a graduate of the first class to officially bear the name UBC, and this poster was created for the 1919 production of the Oscar Wilde classic. The theatre program can be seen on this page. It was not without controversy, however, as an editorial that ran in the January 9, 1919 Ubyssey lambasted the theatre for its selection:

We note with more disgust than surprise that the Players’ Club has chosen for the spring play “The Importance of Being Earnest,” by Oscar Wilde. It does seem extraordinary that from the vast army of playwrights, ancient and modern, Oscar Wilde should be the one favored by the executive of this club; but it is the play itself more than its writer that meets with our disapproval. It would seem fitting indeed that an organization of University students, enjoying the broadening process of “higher education,” should endeavor to stand for the moral as well as the merely intellectual qualities in the plays with which the University name must be associated by the general public….

But was the editorial intentionally written to garner a response? A week later, a rebuttal appeared in the form of a letter to the editors:

Dear Sir: I read with amazement, mitigated by compassion, your amazing attack on the masterpiece chosen by the Players’ Club for their spring production, it seems scarcely credible that anyone who has carefully read this play could make such absurd comments. Your criticisms seem to be levelled against the character of the author and the moral attitude of the play. The first point I shall pass over as unworthy of discussion. If standard works are to be judged by the morality of their authors, then our literature would be sadly depleted. As for the second charge, I am entirely in agreement with you that the play was written primarily to amuse. If we went to acquire only “higher education” through the stage, we do not attend Gilbert and Sullivan’s operas nor any other exhilarating and piffling productions which for years have been drawing immense audiences from all ranks of life in London and New York. We even exclude the great Shakespearian comedies for fear they upset the gravity of our thoughts. I venture to say ninety per cent, of our great plays aim not at “higher education,” but at wholesome amusement, which in itself is highly beneficial. I am even inclined to think it would do you good, Mr. Editor, to relax your ponderous solemnity with an occasional laugh…

On March 13, it was reported that the “WILDE COMEDY PLAYED TO FULL HOUSE—ACTORS WELL APPLAUDED”

"The University Players, who on Saturday brought to a close their excellent ‘performance of ‘The Importance of Being Earnest,’ did more than give the Vancouver public some delightful hpurs of amusement. They have assisted to put Oscar Wilde ‘where he belongs’— back amongst he most brilliant writers of the Victorian era." Such is the tribute paid to the Players’ Club by one of the editors of “The World.” "The Importance of Being Earnest" is not an easy play for amateurs to act; and the very creditable performances given by our students at the Avenue last week, before large audiences, shows both an aptitude for acting and a capacity for hard work on the part of the performers. The staging of the play was excellent, and no words can adequately describe the charm of the setting in the second act. The costumes were appropriate, the dresses of the ladies being both fashionable and, on the whole, well suited to their roles as English society ladies…

To put things in perspective, UBC was in its 4th year when this play was produced, and Ernest was 25 years old when he produced this poster. I think the poster clearly demonstrates that Ernest was an artistic tour de force and an early achiever! His assortment of drawings in the Vancouver Archives is one of my favourite collections in the entire Vancouver Archives! Vive Le Messurier!

The Importance of Being Earnest, a UBC Theatre playbill by Ernest Le Messurier, cartoonist and commercial artist, from the Ernest Le Messurier Comic Collection in the Vancouver Archives, 76-32 #121. Ernest was a graduate of the first class to officially bear the name UBC, and this poster was created for the 1919 production of the Oscar Wilde classic. The theatre program can be seen on this page. It was not without controversy, however, as an editorial that ran in the January 9, 1919 Ubyssey lambasted the theatre for its selection:

We note with more disgust than surprise that the Players’ Club has chosen for the spring play “The Importance of Being Earnest,” by Oscar Wilde. It does seem extraordinary that from the vast army of playwrights, ancient and modern, Oscar Wilde should be the one favored by the executive of this club; but it is the play itself more than its writer that meets with our disapproval. It would seem fitting indeed that an organization of University students, enjoying the broadening process of “higher education,” should endeavor to stand for the moral as well as the merely intellectual qualities in the plays with which the University name must be associated by the general public….

But was the editorial intentionally written to garner a response? A week later, a rebuttal appeared in the form of a letter to the editors:

Dear Sir: I read with amazement, mitigated by compassion, your amazing attack on the masterpiece chosen by the Players’ Club for their spring production, it seems scarcely credible that anyone who has carefully read this play could make such absurd comments.

Your criticisms seem to be levelled against the character of the author and the moral attitude of the play. The first point I shall pass over as unworthy of discussion. If standard works are to be judged by the morality of their authors, then our literature would be sadly depleted.

As for the second charge, I am entirely in agreement with you that the play was written primarily to amuse. If we went to acquire only “higher education” through the stage, we do not attend Gilbert and Sullivan’s operas nor any other exhilarating and piffling productions which for years have been drawing immense audiences from all ranks of life in London and New York. We even exclude the great Shakespearian comedies for fear they upset the gravity of our thoughts. I venture to say ninety per cent, of our great plays aim not at “higher education,” but at wholesome amusement, which in itself is highly beneficial. I am even inclined to think it would do you good, Mr. Editor, to relax your ponderous solemnity with an occasional laugh…

On March 13, it was reported that the “WILDE COMEDY PLAYED TO FULL HOUSE—ACTORS WELL APPLAUDED”

"The University Players, who on Saturday brought to a close their excellent ‘performance of ‘The Importance of Being Earnest,’ did more than give the Vancouver public some delightful hpurs of amusement. They have assisted to put Oscar Wilde ‘where he belongs’— back amongst he most brilliant writers of the Victorian era."

Such is the tribute paid to the Players’ Club by one of the editors of “The World.”

"The Importance of Being Earnest" is not an easy play for amateurs to act; and the very creditable performances given by our students at the Avenue last week, before large audiences, shows both an aptitude for acting and a capacity for hard work on the part of the performers.

The staging of the play was excellent, and no words can adequately describe the charm of the setting in the second act. The costumes were appropriate, the dresses of the ladies being both fashionable and, on the whole, well suited to their roles as English society ladies…

To put things in perspective, UBC was in its 4th year when this play was produced, and Ernest was 25 years old when he produced this poster. I think the poster clearly demonstrates that Ernest was an artistic tour de force and an early achiever! His assortment of drawings in the Vancouver Archives is one of my favourite collections in the entire Vancouver Archives! Vive Le Messurier!

Her Valentines, an editorial cartoon by Harry Palmer, from the front page of the Vancouver Daily World, February 14, 1913 (with a little colour added!)
I love the little valentine on the right from South Vancouver, “I hope to be with you soon!” Miss Vancouver doesn’t even notice, completely enamoured with the $8,000,000 Canadian Northern Terminus station!
Happy Valentines!

Her Valentines, an editorial cartoon by Harry Palmer, from the front page of the Vancouver Daily World, February 14, 1913 (with a little colour added!)

I love the little valentine on the right from South Vancouver, “I hope to be with you soon!” Miss Vancouver doesn’t even notice, completely enamoured with the $8,000,000 Canadian Northern Terminus station!

Happy Valentines!

What he wants in 1913, an editorial cartoon in the Vancouver Daily World newspaper, January 11, 1913, page 6. The cartoon by Boardman (whose first name I haven’t determined) shows Captain Vancouver dreaming of all the things he wants for his city, like a new city hall, False Creek improvements with union depot and railway yards, subways under the CPR right-of-way on Hastings and Pender Street, harbour improvements for Panama Canal trade, and grain elevators for Vancouver. When he says subways under the CPR, he didn’t mean rapid transit subway, but a bridge that went beneath the crazy railway track that unceremoniously cut right through Gastown! Can you imagine the downtown congestion a steam train would have caused?! Dreadful!
This cartoon didn’t make it into my show Vancouver Imagined, largely because I just came across it 2 days ago! It would have been fun to include a few more cartoons and cartoonists in the show, but that’s another show entirely!

What he wants in 1913, an editorial cartoon in the Vancouver Daily World newspaper, January 11, 1913, page 6. The cartoon by Boardman (whose first name I haven’t determined) shows Captain Vancouver dreaming of all the things he wants for his city, like a new city hall, False Creek improvements with union depot and railway yards, subways under the CPR right-of-way on Hastings and Pender Street, harbour improvements for Panama Canal trade, and grain elevators for Vancouver. When he says subways under the CPR, he didn’t mean rapid transit subway, but a bridge that went beneath the crazy railway track that unceremoniously cut right through Gastown! Can you imagine the downtown congestion a steam train would have caused?! Dreadful!

This cartoon didn’t make it into my show Vancouver Imagined, largely because I just came across it 2 days ago! It would have been fun to include a few more cartoons and cartoonists in the show, but that’s another show entirely!

The End of the Seventies by Michael Kluckner, a full page editorial cartoon from the December 29, 1979 issue of the Vancouver Sun. Michael reminisces about his early cartooning career here on his site. About the cartoon, Michael writes: 

The managing editor bought the original (I wonder if it still exists?) which was a large, about 20 x 30 inch, pen and ink drawing on illustration board. So many faces and events: (from the top including) Vietnamese boat people, Jane Fonda, Kent State, starving Indians, Bill Vanderzalm, Pat McGeer, Dave Barrett, Bill Bennett, the Bee Gees, John Travolta, Rod Stewart, Henry Kissinger, Nixon and Watergate, Gerald Ford, Tom Campbell, Rene Levesque, Pierre Trudeau, the FLQ, Peter Lougheed on the big car (“Let the Bastards Freeze in the Dark”), the oil crisis, Joe Clark, Jimmy Carter, the Jonestown mass suicide, Edward Kennedy, Jerry Brown, Jackie Onassis, Ayatollah Khomeini, Margaret Trudeau (& Mick Jagger – should’ve drawn Ronny Wood), John Diefenbaker as Brutus, Robert Stanfield, David Lewis, Jean Drapeau and Robert Bourassa and the Montreal Olympics, Jean Chrétien, Ian Smith of Rhodesia, Willy Brandt and Brezhnev the Russian premier …. and “Jaws.” The Air Otto reference was for Liberal cabinet minister Otto Lang, one of the pigs at the trough of that era. The only glitch was the blank banner at the bottom, which was supposed to read “How Soon Could We Forget?” in red ink, but it got stripped out of the black plate and not put into the red one by the Sun production crew. Oh well….

Though Michael ultimately never pursued the path of the newspaper cartoonist, we’re grateful for the many contributions he has made to the community since these early days. Heritage advocacy, a lifetime of fine art, and writing and illustrating some 15 books - all of these amount to no small feat! Thanks, Michael!

The End of the Seventies by Michael Kluckner, a full page editorial cartoon from the December 29, 1979 issue of the Vancouver Sun. Michael reminisces about his early cartooning career here on his site. About the cartoon, Michael writes: 

The managing editor bought the original (I wonder if it still exists?) which was a large, about 20 x 30 inch, pen and ink drawing on illustration board. So many faces and events: (from the top including) Vietnamese boat people, Jane Fonda, Kent State, starving Indians, Bill Vanderzalm, Pat McGeer, Dave Barrett, Bill Bennett, the Bee Gees, John Travolta, Rod Stewart, Henry Kissinger, Nixon and Watergate, Gerald Ford, Tom Campbell, Rene Levesque, Pierre Trudeau, the FLQ, Peter Lougheed on the big car (“Let the Bastards Freeze in the Dark”), the oil crisis, Joe Clark, Jimmy Carter, the Jonestown mass suicide, Edward Kennedy, Jerry Brown, Jackie Onassis, Ayatollah Khomeini, Margaret Trudeau (& Mick Jagger – should’ve drawn Ronny Wood), John Diefenbaker as Brutus, Robert Stanfield, David Lewis, Jean Drapeau and Robert Bourassa and the Montreal Olympics, Jean Chrétien, Ian Smith of Rhodesia, Willy Brandt and Brezhnev the Russian premier …. and “Jaws.” The Air Otto reference was for Liberal cabinet minister Otto Lang, one of the pigs at the trough of that era. The only glitch was the blank banner at the bottom, which was supposed to read “How Soon Could We Forget?” in red ink, but it got stripped out of the black plate and not put into the red one by the Sun production crew. Oh well….

Though Michael ultimately never pursued the path of the newspaper cartoonist, we’re grateful for the many contributions he has made to the community since these early days. Heritage advocacy, a lifetime of fine art, and writing and illustrating some 15 books - all of these amount to no small feat! Thanks, Michael!

Roy Peterson’s “The End is Nigh!”, his last submitted cartoon when he was laid off at the Vancouver Sun in 2009 at age 73. It was rejected, giving him a coveted “Golden Spike Award”, the Association of American Editorial Cartoonists’ award for the best rejected editorial cartoon. Roy Peterson passed away on September 29, 2013. via Remembering Roy Peterson by Shannon Clarke in The Ryerson Review of Journalism.

Roy Peterson’s “The End is Nigh!”, his last submitted cartoon when he was laid off at the Vancouver Sun in 2009 at age 73. It was rejected, giving him a coveted “Golden Spike Award”, the Association of American Editorial Cartoonists’ award for the best rejected editorial cartoon. Roy Peterson passed away on September 29, 2013. via Remembering Roy Peterson by Shannon Clarke in The Ryerson Review of Journalism.

Comic fans at Canada Place, a custom comic created for use in the VanCAF 2013 VIP art books by Sam Logan. VanCAF took place back in May of this year, but with all the images emerging from NY Comic Con, and with fall on the horizon, I thought it would make an appropriate post.

Comic fans at Canada Place, a custom comic created for use in the VanCAF 2013 VIP art books by Sam Logan. VanCAF took place back in May of this year, but with all the images emerging from NY Comic Con, and with fall on the horizon, I thought it would make an appropriate post.

An American’s Guide to Vancouver by Marv Newland in the July, 1979 issue of Vancouver magazine. This cartoon led off a rather interesting article also written by Marv, where he profiles a whole list of cultural noteworthy items and establishments, including our currency, burgers, baseball, and television.
Allow me to take a moment to look back at the businesses mentioned; they include the Fresgo Inn (now moved to Surrey), the Frying Dutchman (now the De Dutch franchise; the original location opened August, 1970 at the current site of Black Dog Video, 3451 Cambie), Lynn’s (now Bikram Yoga Kitsilano), the Topanga Cafe (opened in 1978 and still at 2904 W. 4th Avenue), the Montreal Bagel Factory (now Royal Feet Vancouver Reflexology Acupuncture, I think), Kaplan’s Deli (still at 5775 Oak Street, I believe), Szasz (now the site of the restaurant West, 2881 Granville Street), Rubin’s (formerly at 974 Granville), Dai Kee (formerly at 540 Main Street), Il Corsaro (moved to Maple Ridge after 20 years on the Drive), European News and Import House (no longer on Robson or Hastings), and Universal News & Gifts (possibly the site of Versus Training Center in Gastown?). Oh, and back in 1979, nearly everything was closed on Sundays!
Update! Michael Kluckner adds:

Maybe as late as 1979, Universal News occupied a small low building at 108 East Hastings (now the Acme something-or-other) that had a minor distinction as the city’s first bicycle and auto repair shop. I remember Universal News for its wide range of foreign (and especially radical) newspapers; it was owned by a Finnish immigrant named Paakspuu, whose son I went to school with. There’s probably a connection in there between the shop and the general radicalism of many Finns who came to Canada in that era.

Postcards are a recurring element in Marv’s work, as his site Marv Cards attests. His animation work has been produced in Vancouver under the International Rocketship moniker for over 20 years. Here’s a vintage video which features Marv, circa 2000. You can order a DVD of the best of International Rocketship directly from Marv, as described here on Cartoon Brew.

An American’s Guide to Vancouver by Marv Newland in the July, 1979 issue of Vancouver magazine. This cartoon led off a rather interesting article also written by Marv, where he profiles a whole list of cultural noteworthy items and establishments, including our currency, burgers, baseball, and television.

Allow me to take a moment to look back at the businesses mentioned; they include the Fresgo Inn (now moved to Surrey), the Frying Dutchman (now the De Dutch franchise; the original location opened August, 1970 at the current site of Black Dog Video, 3451 Cambie), Lynn’s (now Bikram Yoga Kitsilano), the Topanga Cafe (opened in 1978 and still at 2904 W. 4th Avenue), the Montreal Bagel Factory (now Royal Feet Vancouver Reflexology Acupuncture, I think), Kaplan’s Deli (still at 5775 Oak Street, I believe), Szasz (now the site of the restaurant West, 2881 Granville Street), Rubin’s (formerly at 974 Granville), Dai Kee (formerly at 540 Main Street), Il Corsaro (moved to Maple Ridge after 20 years on the Drive), European News and Import House (no longer on Robson or Hastings), and Universal News & Gifts (possibly the site of Versus Training Center in Gastown?). Oh, and back in 1979, nearly everything was closed on Sundays!

Update! Michael Kluckner adds:

Maybe as late as 1979, Universal News occupied a small low building at 108 East Hastings (now the Acme something-or-other) that had a minor distinction as the city’s first bicycle and auto repair shop. I remember Universal News for its wide range of foreign (and especially radical) newspapers; it was owned by a Finnish immigrant named Paakspuu, whose son I went to school with. There’s probably a connection in there between the shop and the general radicalism of many Finns who came to Canada in that era.

Postcards are a recurring element in Marv’s work, as his site Marv Cards attests. His animation work has been produced in Vancouver under the International Rocketship moniker for over 20 years. Here’s a vintage video which features Marv, circa 2000. You can order a DVD of the best of International Rocketship directly from Marv, as described here on Cartoon Brew.

From January 1st, 1922 in the Vancouver Sunday Sun, a cartoon courtesy of the Denver Post, illustrated by Albert Wilbur Steele. “Keep to the Right! Lives of Mothers and Babes are Priceless—Watch out!” This of course represents the date that traffic switched from the left side of the road to the right side of the road in British Columbia. Chuck Davis reported on his website: “The change went surprisingly smoothly; there were no accidents.” Thanks to HeritageVancouver for tweeting me the cartoon! Although this cartoon is not actually created in Vancouver by a Vancouverite, it is still worth taking a moment to delve into some history on the artist. 
Born in Illinois in June of 1862, Albert Wilbur married Anne Crary and had 4 children, one of whom died at birth or as an infant. Albert passed away from pneumonia on March 12, 1925 in Denver, Colorado. Ancestry.com shows his three children also passed away in 1925, but I do not believe this is necessarily correct. It’s possible there may be some confusion with another George C Steele, and at least one of his two daughters, Eva C Rogers of Berkeley may well have lived to the 1940s. His youngest daughter, Agnes M Steele married someone named Paul Brown of Denver, a decidedly difficult name to search for any genealogical information! Albert Wilbur’s wife Anne survived to the year 1941.
Herein lies another tragic epidemic, there is typically very little biographical info that can be gleaned from the web on early newspaper cartoonists, and Mr. Albert Wilbur Steele is no exception. However, there is one academic paper dedicated to his work which illustrates how significant and powerful the early cartoonists of the era actually were.
“The Image-makers’ Arsenal in an Age of War and Empire, 1898-99: A Cartoon Essay, Featuring the Work of Charles Bartholomew (of the Minneapolis Journal) and Albert Wilbur Steele (of the Denver Post)” was written by Bonnie M. Miller of UMass, Boston, and the article can be rented or purchased online here ($5.99 rental, $30 purchase); recommended for cartoon historians!
Nearly all of the Vancouver Sun from 1922 is in the Google News Archive, which is great, but what’s sad is the fact that there are no more additions being made to the Google News Archive, in part because publishers are trying to commodify their archives. Thankfully, there are a few local institutions who have picked up the torch and are leading their own collective digitization strategies, like this initiative that UBC has taken. Beyond that, if you’re looking to lead your own digitization campaign, there’s always archive.org!

From January 1st, 1922 in the Vancouver Sunday Sun, a cartoon courtesy of the Denver Post, illustrated by Albert Wilbur Steele. “Keep to the Right! Lives of Mothers and Babes are Priceless—Watch out!” This of course represents the date that traffic switched from the left side of the road to the right side of the road in British Columbia. Chuck Davis reported on his website: “The change went surprisingly smoothly; there were no accidents.” Thanks to HeritageVancouver for tweeting me the cartoon! Although this cartoon is not actually created in Vancouver by a Vancouverite, it is still worth taking a moment to delve into some history on the artist. 

Born in Illinois in June of 1862, Albert Wilbur married Anne Crary and had 4 children, one of whom died at birth or as an infant. Albert passed away from pneumonia on March 12, 1925 in Denver, Colorado. Ancestry.com shows his three children also passed away in 1925, but I do not believe this is necessarily correct. It’s possible there may be some confusion with another George C Steele, and at least one of his two daughters, Eva C Rogers of Berkeley may well have lived to the 1940s. His youngest daughter, Agnes M Steele married someone named Paul Brown of Denver, a decidedly difficult name to search for any genealogical information! Albert Wilbur’s wife Anne survived to the year 1941.

Herein lies another tragic epidemic, there is typically very little biographical info that can be gleaned from the web on early newspaper cartoonists, and Mr. Albert Wilbur Steele is no exception. However, there is one academic paper dedicated to his work which illustrates how significant and powerful the early cartoonists of the era actually were.

The Image-makers’ Arsenal in an Age of War and Empire, 1898-99: A Cartoon Essay, Featuring the Work of Charles Bartholomew (of the Minneapolis Journal) and Albert Wilbur Steele (of the Denver Post)” was written by Bonnie M. Miller of UMass, Boston, and the article can be rented or purchased online here ($5.99 rental, $30 purchase); recommended for cartoon historians!

Nearly all of the Vancouver Sun from 1922 is in the Google News Archive, which is great, but what’s sad is the fact that there are no more additions being made to the Google News Archive, in part because publishers are trying to commodify their archives. Thankfully, there are a few local institutions who have picked up the torch and are leading their own collective digitization strategies, like this initiative that UBC has taken. Beyond that, if you’re looking to lead your own digitization campaign, there’s always archive.org!

Tonight is the launch of the Cloudscape Anthology Waterlogged!

The event happens Thursday, September 6, 2013 from 6-8pm at the Maritime Museum in Vancouver. You can register to attend here or on Facebook.

Above you can see Jeff Ellis has posted some pre-production cells before adding the text from his story, set in 1925 in Vancouver. Especially exciting is the opening image features the classic CPR steamship, the Empress of Japan!

The whole anthology is loaded with local goodness; you really ought to check it out; available in ebook and in print. Come to the book launch and collect autographs!

via japanese-cowboy

A panel from a Fraser Wilson comic, numbered 86-40, titled # 7 The Handicap Down South, from the Jack Boothe Fonds in the Vancouver Archives. You can see from the full panel that this is essentially the week’s news in review, covering topics such as the escalation of armament leading up to WWII, the Japanese question in British Columbia, the old Hotel Vancouver filing for unemployment, the sentencing of Social Credit by the Supreme Court (I believe Mother Abe refers to Social Credit politician Abe William Miller), and the Handicap Down South, showing Seabiscuit struggling with a flood at the racetrack. From these events, I am guessing the publication date is from 1939. The final panel may be referring to the 1939 California tropical storm in September of 1939. This was also a few months after the new Hotel Vancouver was opened, and of course, falls on the eve of WWII.

cloudscapecomics:

Waterlogged: Tales from the Seventh Sea Launch Party
We at The Cloudscape Comics Society are pleased to announce the launch of our 7th graphic novel! Featuring art by Sam Logan, Nina Matsumoto, Angela Melick, Colin Upton, Lucy Bellwood, and more!  With stories that range from deep space exploration to terrifying tea pirates, you won’t find a better companion for your berth.
On Thursday September 5th, visit us at The Vancouver Maritime Museum from 6 to 8pm. Buy some new books, meet the artists, grab a drink, eat some food, and tour the museum, enjoying artifacts from the sea.
Make sure to RSVP here
See you there!

cloudscapecomics:

Waterlogged: Tales from the Seventh Sea Launch Party

We at The Cloudscape Comics Society are pleased to announce the launch of our 7th graphic novel! Featuring art by Sam Logan, Nina Matsumoto, Angela Melick, Colin Upton, Lucy Bellwood, and more!  With stories that range from deep space exploration to terrifying tea pirates, you won’t find a better companion for your berth.

On Thursday September 5th, visit us at The Vancouver Maritime Museum from 6 to 8pm. Buy some new books, meet the artists, grab a drink, eat some food, and tour the museum, enjoying artifacts from the sea.

Make sure to RSVP here


See you there!

steverolston:

Last week I wrapped up another comic course at VanArts. As usual, not everyone completely finished their four pages but I think they all walked away with a smile on their face and some knowledge in their noggin. I gotta say, it does feel good that many of my students express real gratitude for the things they’ve learned in my class. Most often it’s a variation of “I didn’t realize just how much thinking and hard work goes into making comics.” It’s true. Comics can be fun but it’s not always easy. My main goal with the course has always been to shed light on the process and possible storytelling hurdles so that the students don’t have to learn everything through their own slow trial-and-error.
If you want to be part of the next group, the time to sign up is now! My next Introduction to Comic Book Production course is scheduled to start up on Sept 3rd at the Vancouver Institute of Media Arts (VanArts) and we still need a few more students to make it happen. It’s a 12-week course that runs on Monday nights (or Tuesday if there’s a holiday). I take my students through the process of writing, thumbnailing, penciling, inking and lettering a four-page comic. There’s a strong emphasis on clear storytelling, in addition to teaching all the other things I’ve learned during my thirteen years as a comic book artist.
Feel free to ask me any questions you may have about the course. Or head over to the VanArts website to register now:
www.vanarts.com/courses/introduction-comic-book-production

Update! New start date for this comic book class at VanArts. Tell all your aspiring cartoonist friends in the #Vancouver area that they’ve got another week to sign up! Start date will be Sept 9th. Update via flickr

steverolston:

Last week I wrapped up another comic course at VanArts. As usual, not everyone completely finished their four pages but I think they all walked away with a smile on their face and some knowledge in their noggin. I gotta say, it does feel good that many of my students express real gratitude for the things they’ve learned in my class. Most often it’s a variation of “I didn’t realize just how much thinking and hard work goes into making comics.” It’s true. Comics can be fun but it’s not always easy. My main goal with the course has always been to shed light on the process and possible storytelling hurdles so that the students don’t have to learn everything through their own slow trial-and-error.

If you want to be part of the next group, the time to sign up is now! My next Introduction to Comic Book Production course is scheduled to start up on Sept 3rd at the Vancouver Institute of Media Arts (VanArts) and we still need a few more students to make it happen. It’s a 12-week course that runs on Monday nights (or Tuesday if there’s a holiday). I take my students through the process of writing, thumbnailing, penciling, inking and lettering a four-page comic. There’s a strong emphasis on clear storytelling, in addition to teaching all the other things I’ve learned during my thirteen years as a comic book artist.

Feel free to ask me any questions you may have about the course. Or head over to the VanArts website to register now:

www.vanarts.com/courses/introduction-comic-book-production

Update! New start date for this comic book class at VanArts. Tell all your aspiring cartoonist friends in the #Vancouver area that they’ve got another week to sign up! Start date will be Sept 9th. Update via flickr

colinupton:

Colin’s Cartoon Corner
Comic strip for Vancouver Review, literary freepaper
1992
Ink on illustration board
Yet more reflection on the separatist nonsense.  I believe at the time the separatists in Quebec were at it again while First Nations in Quebec were voting to separate from Quebec to stay in Canada if Quebec separated. Other districts of Quebec were also musing on staying in Canada if Quebec separated.  Of course the separatists mysteriously insisted that somehow Quebec was indivisible, while Canada was not…  the whole thing was getting so silly that I figured eventually we’d all separate into our own micro-nations, an idea that has also inspired numerous artists to make their own postage stamps etc … you can detect something of the miserable conditions of my corner of the basement I lived in for 16 years.

New Caledonia! Our own flag, and currency!

colinupton:

Colin’s Cartoon Corner

Comic strip for Vancouver Review, literary freepaper

1992

Ink on illustration board

Yet more reflection on the separatist nonsense.  I believe at the time the separatists in Quebec were at it again while First Nations in Quebec were voting to separate from Quebec to stay in Canada if Quebec separated. Other districts of Quebec were also musing on staying in Canada if Quebec separated.  Of course the separatists mysteriously insisted that somehow Quebec was indivisible, while Canada was not…  the whole thing was getting so silly that I figured eventually we’d all separate into our own micro-nations, an idea that has also inspired numerous artists to make their own postage stamps etc … you can detect something of the miserable conditions of my corner of the basement I lived in for 16 years.

New Caledonia! Our own flag, and currency!

cloudscapecomics:

The Sketch-a-thon and no-staple mini comic workshop last weekend went very smoothly! Thanks for joining us for those events! But the fun trains doesn’t stop with Cloudscape, oh no. This weekend, you are all invited to the Vancouver Comics Art Festival at the Roundhouse (181 Roundhouse Mews,

cloudscapecomics:

The Sketch-a-thon and no-staple mini comic workshop last weekend went very smoothly! Thanks for joining us for those events!

But the fun trains doesn’t stop with Cloudscape, oh no.

This weekend, you are all invited to the Vancouver Comics Art Festival at the Roundhouse (181 Roundhouse Mews,

colinupton:

Self-Indulgent Comics #42
Another new mini-comic for the upcoming (May 25th/26th) 2nd annual Vancaf Small Press Convention coming up at the Roundhouse (it’s also free to attend).  In this issue I enter the hallowed halls of ART!  This one was painted in black, white and grey gouache, a nice flat medium but difficult in that it drys a different tone than when applied wet. 
Please note that this mini-comic and many others are available from Colin Upton Comics - colinupton@telus.net - both individually and in sets at reasonable prices.

colinupton:

Self-Indulgent Comics #42

Another new mini-comic for the upcoming (May 25th/26th) 2nd annual Vancaf Small Press Convention coming up at the Roundhouse (it’s also free to attend).  In this issue I enter the hallowed halls of ART!  This one was painted in black, white and grey gouache, a nice flat medium but difficult in that it drys a different tone than when applied wet. 

Please note that this mini-comic and many others are available from Colin Upton Comics - colinupton@telus.net - both individually and in sets at reasonable prices.