Her Valentines, an editorial cartoon by Harry Palmer, from the front page of the Vancouver Daily World, February 14, 1913 (with a little colour added!)
I love the little valentine on the right from South Vancouver, “I hope to be with you soon!” Miss Vancouver doesn’t even notice, completely enamoured with the $8,000,000 Canadian Northern Terminus station!
Happy Valentines!

Her Valentines, an editorial cartoon by Harry Palmer, from the front page of the Vancouver Daily World, February 14, 1913 (with a little colour added!)

I love the little valentine on the right from South Vancouver, “I hope to be with you soon!” Miss Vancouver doesn’t even notice, completely enamoured with the $8,000,000 Canadian Northern Terminus station!

Happy Valentines!

What he wants in 1913, an editorial cartoon in the Vancouver Daily World newspaper, January 11, 1913, page 6. The cartoon by Boardman (whose first name I haven’t determined) shows Captain Vancouver dreaming of all the things he wants for his city, like a new city hall, False Creek improvements with union depot and railway yards, subways under the CPR right-of-way on Hastings and Pender Street, harbour improvements for Panama Canal trade, and grain elevators for Vancouver. When he says subways under the CPR, he didn’t mean rapid transit subway, but a bridge that went beneath the crazy railway track that unceremoniously cut right through Gastown! Can you imagine the downtown congestion a steam train would have caused?! Dreadful!
This cartoon didn’t make it into my show Vancouver Imagined, largely because I just came across it 2 days ago! It would have been fun to include a few more cartoons and cartoonists in the show, but that’s another show entirely!

What he wants in 1913, an editorial cartoon in the Vancouver Daily World newspaper, January 11, 1913, page 6. The cartoon by Boardman (whose first name I haven’t determined) shows Captain Vancouver dreaming of all the things he wants for his city, like a new city hall, False Creek improvements with union depot and railway yards, subways under the CPR right-of-way on Hastings and Pender Street, harbour improvements for Panama Canal trade, and grain elevators for Vancouver. When he says subways under the CPR, he didn’t mean rapid transit subway, but a bridge that went beneath the crazy railway track that unceremoniously cut right through Gastown! Can you imagine the downtown congestion a steam train would have caused?! Dreadful!

This cartoon didn’t make it into my show Vancouver Imagined, largely because I just came across it 2 days ago! It would have been fun to include a few more cartoons and cartoonists in the show, but that’s another show entirely!

The End of the Seventies by Michael Kluckner, a full page editorial cartoon from the December 29, 1979 issue of the Vancouver Sun. Michael reminisces about his early cartooning career here on his site. About the cartoon, Michael writes: 

The managing editor bought the original (I wonder if it still exists?) which was a large, about 20 x 30 inch, pen and ink drawing on illustration board. So many faces and events: (from the top including) Vietnamese boat people, Jane Fonda, Kent State, starving Indians, Bill Vanderzalm, Pat McGeer, Dave Barrett, Bill Bennett, the Bee Gees, John Travolta, Rod Stewart, Henry Kissinger, Nixon and Watergate, Gerald Ford, Tom Campbell, Rene Levesque, Pierre Trudeau, the FLQ, Peter Lougheed on the big car (“Let the Bastards Freeze in the Dark”), the oil crisis, Joe Clark, Jimmy Carter, the Jonestown mass suicide, Edward Kennedy, Jerry Brown, Jackie Onassis, Ayatollah Khomeini, Margaret Trudeau (& Mick Jagger – should’ve drawn Ronny Wood), John Diefenbaker as Brutus, Robert Stanfield, David Lewis, Jean Drapeau and Robert Bourassa and the Montreal Olympics, Jean Chrétien, Ian Smith of Rhodesia, Willy Brandt and Brezhnev the Russian premier …. and “Jaws.” The Air Otto reference was for Liberal cabinet minister Otto Lang, one of the pigs at the trough of that era. The only glitch was the blank banner at the bottom, which was supposed to read “How Soon Could We Forget?” in red ink, but it got stripped out of the black plate and not put into the red one by the Sun production crew. Oh well….

Though Michael ultimately never pursued the path of the newspaper cartoonist, we’re grateful for the many contributions he has made to the community since these early days. Heritage advocacy, a lifetime of fine art, and writing and illustrating some 15 books - all of these amount to no small feat! Thanks, Michael!

The End of the Seventies by Michael Kluckner, a full page editorial cartoon from the December 29, 1979 issue of the Vancouver Sun. Michael reminisces about his early cartooning career here on his site. About the cartoon, Michael writes: 

The managing editor bought the original (I wonder if it still exists?) which was a large, about 20 x 30 inch, pen and ink drawing on illustration board. So many faces and events: (from the top including) Vietnamese boat people, Jane Fonda, Kent State, starving Indians, Bill Vanderzalm, Pat McGeer, Dave Barrett, Bill Bennett, the Bee Gees, John Travolta, Rod Stewart, Henry Kissinger, Nixon and Watergate, Gerald Ford, Tom Campbell, Rene Levesque, Pierre Trudeau, the FLQ, Peter Lougheed on the big car (“Let the Bastards Freeze in the Dark”), the oil crisis, Joe Clark, Jimmy Carter, the Jonestown mass suicide, Edward Kennedy, Jerry Brown, Jackie Onassis, Ayatollah Khomeini, Margaret Trudeau (& Mick Jagger – should’ve drawn Ronny Wood), John Diefenbaker as Brutus, Robert Stanfield, David Lewis, Jean Drapeau and Robert Bourassa and the Montreal Olympics, Jean Chrétien, Ian Smith of Rhodesia, Willy Brandt and Brezhnev the Russian premier …. and “Jaws.” The Air Otto reference was for Liberal cabinet minister Otto Lang, one of the pigs at the trough of that era. The only glitch was the blank banner at the bottom, which was supposed to read “How Soon Could We Forget?” in red ink, but it got stripped out of the black plate and not put into the red one by the Sun production crew. Oh well….

Though Michael ultimately never pursued the path of the newspaper cartoonist, we’re grateful for the many contributions he has made to the community since these early days. Heritage advocacy, a lifetime of fine art, and writing and illustrating some 15 books - all of these amount to no small feat! Thanks, Michael!

Roy Peterson’s “The End is Nigh!”, his last submitted cartoon when he was laid off at the Vancouver Sun in 2009 at age 73. It was rejected, giving him a coveted “Golden Spike Award”, the Association of American Editorial Cartoonists’ award for the best rejected editorial cartoon. Roy Peterson passed away on September 29, 2013. via Remembering Roy Peterson by Shannon Clarke in The Ryerson Review of Journalism.

Roy Peterson’s “The End is Nigh!”, his last submitted cartoon when he was laid off at the Vancouver Sun in 2009 at age 73. It was rejected, giving him a coveted “Golden Spike Award”, the Association of American Editorial Cartoonists’ award for the best rejected editorial cartoon. Roy Peterson passed away on September 29, 2013. via Remembering Roy Peterson by Shannon Clarke in The Ryerson Review of Journalism.

Kitsilano illustrated by Ken Steacy, a special ghoulish and dystopian Halloween edition! This illustration was created for the first issue of Vancouver Magazine in the new millennium, January/February 2000. This was the second issue of the magazine that Douglas Coupland guest edited. There were four illustrations that accompanied an article titled: Vancouver’s future - will it be beauty and brains or dumb and scum? Most likely a mixture. Four illustrators report back. Ken tells me his contribution was the most dystopic; the caption read: 


Kitsilano, Cornwall and Yew. March 47, 2048, 853 GTX. Complete ecological and political failure: melted ice caps; a botched hepatitis-K vaccine; mass extinction. Moral Cleansing squads sent by a fiat U.S. government invade Kits to snuff out marijuana smokers and render extinct Vancouver’s 10-storey-high “Superpot” trees - a geneticists’ blend of cannabis, timber bamboo, Douglas fir and bermuda grass - that have overrun virtually all other vegetation. 


Thanks for the backstory, Ken!

Kitsilano illustrated by Ken Steacy, a special ghoulish and dystopian Halloween edition! This illustration was created for the first issue of Vancouver Magazine in the new millennium, January/February 2000. This was the second issue of the magazine that Douglas Coupland guest edited. There were four illustrations that accompanied an article titled: Vancouver’s future - will it be beauty and brains or dumb and scum? Most likely a mixture. Four illustrators report back. Ken tells me his contribution was the most dystopic; the caption read: 

Kitsilano, Cornwall and Yew. March 47, 2048, 853 GTX. Complete ecological and political failure: melted ice caps; a botched hepatitis-K vaccine; mass extinction. Moral Cleansing squads sent by a fiat U.S. government invade Kits to snuff out marijuana smokers and render extinct Vancouver’s 10-storey-high “Superpot” trees - a geneticists’ blend of cannabis, timber bamboo, Douglas fir and bermuda grass - that have overrun virtually all other vegetation. 
Thanks for the backstory, Ken!
Comic fans at Canada Place, a custom comic created for use in the VanCAF 2013 VIP art books by Sam Logan. VanCAF took place back in May of this year, but with all the images emerging from NY Comic Con, and with fall on the horizon, I thought it would make an appropriate post.

Comic fans at Canada Place, a custom comic created for use in the VanCAF 2013 VIP art books by Sam Logan. VanCAF took place back in May of this year, but with all the images emerging from NY Comic Con, and with fall on the horizon, I thought it would make an appropriate post.

An American’s Guide to Vancouver by Marv Newland in the July, 1979 issue of Vancouver magazine. This cartoon led off a rather interesting article also written by Marv, where he profiles a whole list of cultural noteworthy items and establishments, including our currency, burgers, baseball, and television.
Allow me to take a moment to look back at the businesses mentioned; they include the Fresgo Inn (now moved to Surrey), the Frying Dutchman (now the De Dutch franchise; the original location opened August, 1970 at the current site of Black Dog Video, 3451 Cambie), Lynn’s (now Bikram Yoga Kitsilano), the Topanga Cafe (opened in 1978 and still at 2904 W. 4th Avenue), the Montreal Bagel Factory (now Royal Feet Vancouver Reflexology Acupuncture, I think), Kaplan’s Deli (still at 5775 Oak Street, I believe), Szasz (now the site of the restaurant West, 2881 Granville Street), Rubin’s (formerly at 974 Granville), Dai Kee (formerly at 540 Main Street), Il Corsaro (moved to Maple Ridge after 20 years on the Drive), European News and Import House (no longer on Robson or Hastings), and Universal News & Gifts (possibly the site of Versus Training Center in Gastown?). Oh, and back in 1979, nearly everything was closed on Sundays!
Update! Michael Kluckner adds:

Maybe as late as 1979, Universal News occupied a small low building at 108 East Hastings (now the Acme something-or-other) that had a minor distinction as the city’s first bicycle and auto repair shop. I remember Universal News for its wide range of foreign (and especially radical) newspapers; it was owned by a Finnish immigrant named Paakspuu, whose son I went to school with. There’s probably a connection in there between the shop and the general radicalism of many Finns who came to Canada in that era.

Postcards are a recurring element in Marv’s work, as his site Marv Cards attests. His animation work has been produced in Vancouver under the International Rocketship moniker for over 20 years. Here’s a vintage video which features Marv, circa 2000. You can order a DVD of the best of International Rocketship directly from Marv, as described here on Cartoon Brew.

An American’s Guide to Vancouver by Marv Newland in the July, 1979 issue of Vancouver magazine. This cartoon led off a rather interesting article also written by Marv, where he profiles a whole list of cultural noteworthy items and establishments, including our currency, burgers, baseball, and television.

Allow me to take a moment to look back at the businesses mentioned; they include the Fresgo Inn (now moved to Surrey), the Frying Dutchman (now the De Dutch franchise; the original location opened August, 1970 at the current site of Black Dog Video, 3451 Cambie), Lynn’s (now Bikram Yoga Kitsilano), the Topanga Cafe (opened in 1978 and still at 2904 W. 4th Avenue), the Montreal Bagel Factory (now Royal Feet Vancouver Reflexology Acupuncture, I think), Kaplan’s Deli (still at 5775 Oak Street, I believe), Szasz (now the site of the restaurant West, 2881 Granville Street), Rubin’s (formerly at 974 Granville), Dai Kee (formerly at 540 Main Street), Il Corsaro (moved to Maple Ridge after 20 years on the Drive), European News and Import House (no longer on Robson or Hastings), and Universal News & Gifts (possibly the site of Versus Training Center in Gastown?). Oh, and back in 1979, nearly everything was closed on Sundays!

Update! Michael Kluckner adds:

Maybe as late as 1979, Universal News occupied a small low building at 108 East Hastings (now the Acme something-or-other) that had a minor distinction as the city’s first bicycle and auto repair shop. I remember Universal News for its wide range of foreign (and especially radical) newspapers; it was owned by a Finnish immigrant named Paakspuu, whose son I went to school with. There’s probably a connection in there between the shop and the general radicalism of many Finns who came to Canada in that era.

Postcards are a recurring element in Marv’s work, as his site Marv Cards attests. His animation work has been produced in Vancouver under the International Rocketship moniker for over 20 years. Here’s a vintage video which features Marv, circa 2000. You can order a DVD of the best of International Rocketship directly from Marv, as described here on Cartoon Brew.

Tonight is the launch of the Cloudscape Anthology Waterlogged!

The event happens Thursday, September 6, 2013 from 6-8pm at the Maritime Museum in Vancouver. You can register to attend here or on Facebook.

Above you can see Jeff Ellis has posted some pre-production cells before adding the text from his story, set in 1925 in Vancouver. Especially exciting is the opening image features the classic CPR steamship, the Empress of Japan!

The whole anthology is loaded with local goodness; you really ought to check it out; available in ebook and in print. Come to the book launch and collect autographs!

via japanese-cowboy

A panel from a Fraser Wilson comic, numbered 86-40, titled # 7 The Handicap Down South, from the Jack Boothe Fonds in the Vancouver Archives. You can see from the full panel that this is essentially the week’s news in review, covering topics such as the escalation of armament leading up to WWII, the Japanese question in British Columbia, the old Hotel Vancouver filing for unemployment, the sentencing of Social Credit by the Supreme Court (I believe Mother Abe refers to Social Credit politician Abe William Miller), and the Handicap Down South, showing Seabiscuit struggling with a flood at the racetrack. From these events, I am guessing the publication date is from 1939. The final panel may be referring to the 1939 California tropical storm in September of 1939. This was also a few months after the new Hotel Vancouver was opened, and of course, falls on the eve of WWII.

colinupton:

Colin’s Cartoon Corner
Comic strip for Vancouver Review, literary freepaper
1992
Ink on illustration board
Yet more reflection on the separatist nonsense.  I believe at the time the separatists in Quebec were at it again while First Nations in Quebec were voting to separate from Quebec to stay in Canada if Quebec separated. Other districts of Quebec were also musing on staying in Canada if Quebec separated.  Of course the separatists mysteriously insisted that somehow Quebec was indivisible, while Canada was not…  the whole thing was getting so silly that I figured eventually we’d all separate into our own micro-nations, an idea that has also inspired numerous artists to make their own postage stamps etc … you can detect something of the miserable conditions of my corner of the basement I lived in for 16 years.

New Caledonia! Our own flag, and currency!

colinupton:

Colin’s Cartoon Corner

Comic strip for Vancouver Review, literary freepaper

1992

Ink on illustration board

Yet more reflection on the separatist nonsense.  I believe at the time the separatists in Quebec were at it again while First Nations in Quebec were voting to separate from Quebec to stay in Canada if Quebec separated. Other districts of Quebec were also musing on staying in Canada if Quebec separated.  Of course the separatists mysteriously insisted that somehow Quebec was indivisible, while Canada was not…  the whole thing was getting so silly that I figured eventually we’d all separate into our own micro-nations, an idea that has also inspired numerous artists to make their own postage stamps etc … you can detect something of the miserable conditions of my corner of the basement I lived in for 16 years.

New Caledonia! Our own flag, and currency!

cloudscapecomics:

The Sketch-a-thon and no-staple mini comic workshop last weekend went very smoothly! Thanks for joining us for those events! But the fun trains doesn’t stop with Cloudscape, oh no. This weekend, you are all invited to the Vancouver Comics Art Festival at the Roundhouse (181 Roundhouse Mews,

cloudscapecomics:

The Sketch-a-thon and no-staple mini comic workshop last weekend went very smoothly! Thanks for joining us for those events!

But the fun trains doesn’t stop with Cloudscape, oh no.

This weekend, you are all invited to the Vancouver Comics Art Festival at the Roundhouse (181 Roundhouse Mews,

colinupton:

Self-Indulgent Comics #42
Another new mini-comic for the upcoming (May 25th/26th) 2nd annual Vancaf Small Press Convention coming up at the Roundhouse (it’s also free to attend).  In this issue I enter the hallowed halls of ART!  This one was painted in black, white and grey gouache, a nice flat medium but difficult in that it drys a different tone than when applied wet. 
Please note that this mini-comic and many others are available from Colin Upton Comics - colinupton@telus.net - both individually and in sets at reasonable prices.

colinupton:

Self-Indulgent Comics #42

Another new mini-comic for the upcoming (May 25th/26th) 2nd annual Vancaf Small Press Convention coming up at the Roundhouse (it’s also free to attend).  In this issue I enter the hallowed halls of ART!  This one was painted in black, white and grey gouache, a nice flat medium but difficult in that it drys a different tone than when applied wet. 

Please note that this mini-comic and many others are available from Colin Upton Comics - colinupton@telus.net - both individually and in sets at reasonable prices.

cloudscapecomics:

‘Stratus’ soon fellow cartoonists! Cloudscape’s biggest art show at the Ayden Gallery opens on May 3 at 7:00pm.  If you haven’t signed up yet, do so here! https://www.facebook.com/events/148990701925781/


BK Munn writes about the upcoming show:

Billing it as a “giant show” launching with a signing by all the involved creators, Cloudscape founder Jeff Ellis, reminds us of the origin of the retrospective: “I had a dream that I wanted to boost local comics in Vancouver, The next idea that came… [was] ‘we have all of these artists making comics – rather than spending money to do our own individual works, why don’t we work together and pool our resources to publish something?’”

cloudscapecomics:

‘Stratus’ soon fellow cartoonists! Cloudscape’s biggest art show at the Ayden Gallery opens on May 3 at 7:00pm.

If you haven’t signed up yet, do so here! https://www.facebook.com/events/148990701925781/

BK Munn writes about the upcoming show:

Billing it as a “giant show” launching with a signing by all the involved creators, Cloudscape founder Jeff Ellis, reminds us of the origin of the retrospective: “I had a dream that I wanted to boost local comics in Vancouver, The next idea that came… [was] ‘we have all of these artists making comics – rather than spending money to do our own individual works, why don’t we work together and pool our resources to publish something?’”

In the Village T shirt design contest! Shown here are some of the contestants, including Leah Gregg & Kim Ridgewell, Melanie Kimmett, and Jane Koo. Vote here before the end of the month! From the VIAwesome:

We’ve commissioned ten local illustrators and graphic designers to produce designs inspired by the Village on False Creek. The top three voted designs will then be put in front of a jury which includes VANCOUVERISAWESOME’s Bob Kronbauer, Bob Rennie, and one yet-to-be-named judge. We’ll choose one design from those that’ll be printed onto t-shirts which we’ll be giving away.

Waterlogged Fundraising Video by CloudscapeComics. Cloudscape is currently having a fundraiser to crowdsource the production of their latest publication. Arrrgh, it’s going to be great! Join the campaign here!