Marine Market by Won Kang, the Urban Sketcher. This is a bit like Guess Where Vancouver; who here can identify the location?!
UPDATE! Congrats to alldelightedpeople, who has identified this location as Marine Drive and Gilley Ave! That’s actually Burnaby, to be precise! Oh, and for the record, this has been my 750th post! Only 250 more to go!

Marine Market by Won Kang, the Urban Sketcher. This is a bit like Guess Where Vancouver; who here can identify the location?!

UPDATE! Congrats to alldelightedpeople, who has identified this location as Marine Drive and Gilley Ave! That’s actually Burnaby, to be precise! Oh, and for the record, this has been my 750th post! Only 250 more to go!

Admiral Hotel Mural, from Background / Vancouver - An Artist’s View of the City, October 30, 1972, originally seen in an exhibition at the Vancouver Art Gallery in 1974, recently posted to michaeldecourcy.com. From his bio:

Michael de Courcy, born 1944, in Montreal, Quebec, studied at École des Beaux Arts, Montreal and the Vancouver School of Art. Over the past 45 years he has maintained a studio in Vancouver, British Columbia and exhibited internationally. he has lectured and given workshops at many cultural institutions including the school of the Art Institute of Chicago, York University, the University of British Columbia and Emily Carr College of Art and Design.

The Admiral Hotel is located at 4125 Hastings Street in Burnaby. I’ve been meaning to investigate this in person on the off chance that some part of this mosaic has survived. If anyone has any more photos, I’d love to see them!

Admiral Hotel Mural, from Background / Vancouver - An Artist’s View of the City, October 30, 1972, originally seen in an exhibition at the Vancouver Art Gallery in 1974, recently posted to michaeldecourcy.com. From his bio:

Michael de Courcy, born 1944, in Montreal, Quebec, studied at École des Beaux Arts, Montreal and the Vancouver School of Art. Over the past 45 years he has maintained a studio in Vancouver, British Columbia and exhibited internationally. he has lectured and given workshops at many cultural institutions including the school of the Art Institute of Chicago, York University, the University of British Columbia and Emily Carr College of Art and Design.

The Admiral Hotel is located at 4125 Hastings Street in Burnaby. I’ve been meaning to investigate this in person on the off chance that some part of this mosaic has survived. If anyone has any more photos, I’d love to see them!

The Burnaby Mountain Centennial Pavilion, 100 Centennial Way, Burnaby. This was built for the 1958 centenary celebrations, if you haven’t deduced that already. At this point in time, SFU was merely a recommendation in a report entitled Higher Education in British Columbia and a Plan for the Future, by Dr. J.B. Macdonald [source].
Update! I should add, I didn’t realize that Horizon’s Restaurant is now occupying the Centennial Pavilion! Furthermore, there was a fire at the restaurant in the spring of 2010, but the good news is, they were insured, and the restaurant has been rebuilt thanks in part to $300,000 of additional help from the City of Burnaby. It’s interesting to see how the building has been adapted over time. I’m glad I found this grand opening souvenir program!

The Burnaby Mountain Centennial Pavilion, 100 Centennial Way, Burnaby. This was built for the 1958 centenary celebrations, if you haven’t deduced that already. At this point in time, SFU was merely a recommendation in a report entitled Higher Education in British Columbia and a Plan for the Future, by Dr. J.B. Macdonald [source].

Update! I should add, I didn’t realize that Horizon’s Restaurant is now occupying the Centennial Pavilion! Furthermore, there was a fire at the restaurant in the spring of 2010, but the good news is, they were insured, and the restaurant has been rebuilt thanks in part to $300,000 of additional help from the City of Burnaby. It’s interesting to see how the building has been adapted over time. I’m glad I found this grand opening souvenir program!

A 1968 concept plan by the Vancouver firm of Ehling & Brockington for the Brentwood Town Centre, via Gordon Price’s Price Points on SpacingVancouver.ca

A 1968 concept plan by the Vancouver firm of Ehling & Brockington for the Brentwood Town Centre, via Gordon Price’s Price Points on SpacingVancouver.ca

Visions of Metrotown, 1971. Via Gordon Price’s post on SpacingVancouver.ca, this was the caption below the illustration:

Multi-level Central Area: The main activity level is the pedestrian platform. Underneath is vehicular access, car parking, loading facilities and public transportation. Above are shops, offices and residential clusters.

The drawing was originally published in the 142 page book, "Urban Structure: A study of long range policies which affect the physical structure of an urban area”, written by a staff member in Burnaby’s  Planning Department. I’m not sure if the illustrations are actually credited in the book; I’ll have to take another look at the book if I get a chance. David Pereira has brought this vintage publication back into the spotlight, and he has used it as inspiration for his own Master’s project thesis. Further context is provided in the comments by David:

…the rendering…was intended to be a theoretical mock-up of all the elements that  Burnaby Planners at the time believed should be placed into these Town  Centres. It was never an actual blueprint. It was more of a dreamscape,  if you will. To find out more about which elements were planned for  Metrotown, and why they didn’t make the cut, stay tuned for a future  update on the story behind Metrotown…

Visions of Metrotown, 1971. Via Gordon Price’s post on SpacingVancouver.ca, this was the caption below the illustration:

Multi-level Central Area: The main activity level is the pedestrian platform. Underneath is vehicular access, car parking, loading facilities and public transportation. Above are shops, offices and residential clusters.

The drawing was originally published in the 142 page book, "Urban Structure: A study of long range policies which affect the physical structure of an urban area”, written by a staff member in Burnaby’s Planning Department. I’m not sure if the illustrations are actually credited in the book; I’ll have to take another look at the book if I get a chance. David Pereira has brought this vintage publication back into the spotlight, and he has used it as inspiration for his own Master’s project thesis. Further context is provided in the comments by David:

…the rendering…was intended to be a theoretical mock-up of all the elements that Burnaby Planners at the time believed should be placed into these Town Centres. It was never an actual blueprint. It was more of a dreamscape, if you will. To find out more about which elements were planned for Metrotown, and why they didn’t make the cut, stay tuned for a future update on the story behind Metrotown

Simon Fraser University campus concepts by Arthur Erickson & Geoffrey Massey Architects, Zoltan Kiss, Rhone & Iredale, and R.F. Harrison, from the architectural competition of 1963, seen in the book Seven Stones: A Portrait of Arthur Erickson.

Update: I didn’t realize it wasn’t solely Erickson & Massey who ended up designing the buildings at SFU; from page 57 of Radical campus: Making Simon Fraser University by Hugh J. M. Johnston:

Five firms divided the project according to their placement in the competition. Erickson and Massey, with the first pick, considered the Academic Quadrangle, but took the mall because it was the central building that integrated all the others and that they believed really defined SFU. Rhone and Iredale, with second pick, had their eyes on the Academic Quadrangle, but were persuaded by Zoltan Kiss that the science centre would be better because it would expand in subsequent phases of construction, while the quadrangle, once built, was finished.

Zoltan Kiss took the Academic Quadrangle, which he had wanted all along. With a choice of theatre and gym or library, Robert Harrison chose the library. Duncan McNab and Associates were left with the theatre and gym/pool complex, a result which pleased McNab, who had been a diver on the McGill swim team.

A few more names I had omitted that deserve credit, from the SFU website:

The design chosen was that of a young UBC architecture professor, Arthur Erickson, and his colleague Geoffrey Massey. The four other winners were William R. Rhone and Randle Iredale; Zoltan Kiss; Duncan McNab, Harry Lee, and David Logan; and Robert F. Harrison. The Erickson and Massey design had been the unanimous choice of the judges, and had met all the requirements that Shrum had outlined in his memo.

BCIT, SW1 building, architectural rendering, artist unknown, from the VPL picture file collection.

The history of BCIT’s Burnaby Campus dates back to 1964, a few years  after the BC Vocational Schools opened in Burnaby in 1960. In 1978, the  Pacific Vocational Institute (PVI) was created, comprising of BC  Vocational, Maple Ridge and Sea Island. The merger of BCIT and PVI  officially formed a new and larger BCIT. The first building to be built  at the Burnaby Campus was the NE02 building used for Benchwork and  Joinery, in 1957. First opened as a small operation with its first  technology students on campus in 1964, this campus now houses vast  industry based training programs and facilities, and offers numerous,  exciting career paths for its students… source

BCIT, SW1 building, architectural rendering, artist unknown, from the VPL picture file collection.

The history of BCIT’s Burnaby Campus dates back to 1964, a few years after the BC Vocational Schools opened in Burnaby in 1960. In 1978, the Pacific Vocational Institute (PVI) was created, comprising of BC Vocational, Maple Ridge and Sea Island. The merger of BCIT and PVI officially formed a new and larger BCIT. The first building to be built at the Burnaby Campus was the NE02 building used for Benchwork and Joinery, in 1957. First opened as a small operation with its first technology students on campus in 1964, this campus now houses vast industry based training programs and facilities, and offers numerous, exciting career paths for its students… source

Sketches of Royal Oak area, from the Royal Oak Community Plan, adopted by Council on July 28, 1999, via the Burnaby City Hall website.

Sketches of Royal Oak area, from the Royal Oak Community Plan, adopted by Council on July 28, 1999, via the Burnaby City Hall website.

Full spread of the 1994 brochure featuring the same illustration as seen previously, highlighting the Surrey SkyTrain extension  launch in 1994. The artist has yet to be identified. Thanks, Jhenifer!

Full spread of the 1994 brochure featuring the same illustration as seen previously, highlighting the Surrey SkyTrain extension launch in 1994. The artist has yet to be identified. Thanks, Jhenifer!

More on the same theme, this 1994 brochure features the same illustration seen previously, highlighting the Surrey SkyTrain extension launch in 1994. The artist has yet to be identified.

A detail of a painting titled Burnaby by Erik Lyon.   (Illustrated Vancouver reserves the right to include works from Metro   Vancouver, especially those that are exceptionally brilliant like this   one.) Click here to see more of the full painting.

A detail of a painting titled Burnaby by Erik Lyon. (Illustrated Vancouver reserves the right to include works from Metro Vancouver, especially those that are exceptionally brilliant like this one.) Click here to see more of the full painting.