MAP 547 - Panoramic view of the City of Vancouver, British Columbia, 1898, via the Vancouver Archives. Here you can see a detail of Brewery Creek, and that smoke stack in the centre of the image? That’s the site of Charles Gottfried Doering’s Vancouver Brewery, later known as the Doering & Marstrand Brewery. Actually, after a merger with the Red Cross Brewery, it became known as Vancouver Breweries Limited. There are so many subtle name changes in Vancouver’s beer history, it’s hard to keep track! More about that some other time.
The City of Vancouver Archives recently announced on their blog that thanks to funding from the British Columbia History Digitization Program, they have completed a project to digitize 512 maps and plans.
Maps are great archival records, filled with meticulous details of the city, typically accompanied by exquisite penmanship. However, they are like many early illustrated works—difficult to attribute. The map above, one of the most popular birds eye views of the city, states in very fine print at the bottom right hand corner: “Entered according to act of Parliament of Canada in the year 1898 by J.C. McLagan at the Department of Agriculture.” In a larger embellished font, the map also states “Published by the Vancouver World Printing and Publishing Company, Limited.”
Both of these details are interesting because J.C. (John James Campbell) McLagan was the editor and owner of The World newspaper which operated from 1888-1924. Bessy Lamb gives an excellent early history of The World among other early Vancouver newspapers in this 1942 research paper at UBC, and when you’re finished reading that, you can followup with this paper on women in the early BC newspaper trade, as McLagan’s wife Sara Anne took over the paper after his death. But back to the fine print on the map; it’s still not clear to me what all of this means. Was J.C. McLagan also employed by the Department of Agriculture?
I dug deeper and discovered this Vancouver Board of Trade annual report from 1892, indicating that he was indeed on the standing committee of Agriculture, along with S. Oppenheimer and E.E. Penzer. Actually, J.C. was also on the Immigration committee, so he must have been a busy man! What I really want to know is who was the cartographer?! Did J.C. McLagan actually have time to draw maps in his spare time, along with chairing meetings and running a newspaper?
I believe the answer lies here, in this document on Archive.org (original document in the National Library of Canada). Manitoba and the Great North-West was published in 1882, and it features a full page birds eye view map of the city of Winnipeg, very much in the same style as this map above. J.C. McLagan’s name is clearly stated on the title page, responsible for the “Sketch of the Rise and Progress of Winnipeg”. If the history books have not yet noted John James Campbell McLagan as an excellent cartographer, I believe they now stand corrected.
I hope you this has demonstrated just a few of the things you can learn from an old map! Take that, Google Maps!

MAP 547 - Panoramic view of the City of Vancouver, British Columbia, 1898, via the Vancouver Archives. Here you can see a detail of Brewery Creek, and that smoke stack in the centre of the image? That’s the site of Charles Gottfried Doering’s Vancouver Brewery, later known as the Doering & Marstrand Brewery. Actually, after a merger with the Red Cross Brewery, it became known as Vancouver Breweries Limited. There are so many subtle name changes in Vancouver’s beer history, it’s hard to keep track! More about that some other time.

The City of Vancouver Archives recently announced on their blog that thanks to funding from the British Columbia History Digitization Program, they have completed a project to digitize 512 maps and plans.

Maps are great archival records, filled with meticulous details of the city, typically accompanied by exquisite penmanship. However, they are like many early illustrated works—difficult to attribute. The map above, one of the most popular birds eye views of the city, states in very fine print at the bottom right hand corner: “Entered according to act of Parliament of Canada in the year 1898 by J.C. McLagan at the Department of Agriculture.” In a larger embellished font, the map also states “Published by the Vancouver World Printing and Publishing Company, Limited.”

Both of these details are interesting because J.C. (John James Campbell) McLagan was the editor and owner of The World newspaper which operated from 1888-1924. Bessy Lamb gives an excellent early history of The World among other early Vancouver newspapers in this 1942 research paper at UBC, and when you’re finished reading that, you can followup with this paper on women in the early BC newspaper trade, as McLagan’s wife Sara Anne took over the paper after his death. But back to the fine print on the map; it’s still not clear to me what all of this means. Was J.C. McLagan also employed by the Department of Agriculture?

I dug deeper and discovered this Vancouver Board of Trade annual report from 1892, indicating that he was indeed on the standing committee of Agriculture, along with S. Oppenheimer and E.E. Penzer. Actually, J.C. was also on the Immigration committee, so he must have been a busy man! What I really want to know is who was the cartographer?! Did J.C. McLagan actually have time to draw maps in his spare time, along with chairing meetings and running a newspaper?

I believe the answer lies here, in this document on Archive.org (original document in the National Library of Canada). Manitoba and the Great North-West was published in 1882, and it features a full page birds eye view map of the city of Winnipeg, very much in the same style as this map above. J.C. McLagan’s name is clearly stated on the title page, responsible for the “Sketch of the Rise and Progress of Winnipeg”. If the history books have not yet noted John James Campbell McLagan as an excellent cartographer, I believe they now stand corrected.

I hope you this has demonstrated just a few of the things you can learn from an old map! Take that, Google Maps!

Next week is I Love Transit Week, and the latest Buzzer has a great panoramic sketch by Ginger Ngo across the cover which is actually a colouring contest. There will be one grand prize for children under 12; a second grand prize will be awarded for adults. Mail or email your entries by July 23. Get out your Crayolas and get to work!

Also shown here are three Translink vectorized images which I quite like, originally featured in the print primer brochure for Managing the Transit Network (artist unknown UPDATE! Vector drawings by Dustin Crawford of Invision Creative. Thanks, pw3n!). I once did a crude vectorization of this bus photo, which eventually became a Transit fan button. When done right, this technique can inspire silkscreen envy in the hearts of transportation fans like myself! Dustin, you did an awesome job!

Smoke break on the back deck, a print by Tosh Toru Sugita (yep, I was wrong! I also made up the title). The print is actually titled From Cottage, and it’s dated 1998, not 1978. I did have the numbering correct; it’s definitely the 4th print out of a total of 50. This print was purchased from a second hand shop in Vancouver recently, and I have no other information about the work, aside from the fact that it was framed very nicely. I’ve also asked on Facebook at the Dundarave Print Workshop & Gallery page (located on Granville Island) if anyone recognizes the name.
This may be the first post which I can’t actually substantiate as positively being from Vancouver, but since I found it here in Vancouver, and the subject matter seems appropriate, I’d like to believe it’s from here. I was originally going to title it Woman on the back deck, but I can’t be entirely sure of that either; it may just be someone with long hair, a hat, and baggy clothes!
On somewhat of a derivative note, take a look at this current show at  the Shooting Gallery in San Francisco titled “Smoke Gets in  Your Eyes" featuring work by Parisian   street artist Christian Guémy (aka C215) focusing on the iconography of smoking ads and images.
Happy New Year everyone! You may see less of me on Tumblr this year, but I love you just the same! May this coming year bring you all good cheer!
UPDATE! Scandalous! This is not, in fact, Vancouver! Thanks to Andrea for tracking down the artist, Toru Sugita. He was born in Shiga, Japan, studied in Kyoto, and since the 1990s he has been residing in the San Fransisco Bay area. I think it’s rather amusing how I was able to project certain local traits into the work, making me believe it might be from here. I suppose my next post of the Vancouver Special pop-up book should make up for any lack of local content. One thing remains - it is a very nice print, and Toru is a fine print maker! I shall keep this print in the collection in his honour (and as a reminder to myself that I sometimes make mistakes!)
Toru wrote to me, mentioning that he has in fact been to the Dundarave Print Workshop on Granville Island when he had a show at the ArtBeatus Gallery in 2002. He informs me that the subject is actually  Calistoga, California, and the woman on the deck is his friend visiting  from Japan. He also concedes that Vancouver has the much of the same type of light and  architecture as southern California, so there you have it! Full circle! : )

Smoke break on the back deck, a print by Tosh Toru Sugita (yep, I was wrong! I also made up the title). The print is actually titled From Cottage, and it’s dated 1998, not 1978. I did have the numbering correct; it’s definitely the 4th print out of a total of 50. This print was purchased from a second hand shop in Vancouver recently, and I have no other information about the work, aside from the fact that it was framed very nicely. I’ve also asked on Facebook at the Dundarave Print Workshop & Gallery page (located on Granville Island) if anyone recognizes the name.

This may be the first post which I can’t actually substantiate as positively being from Vancouver, but since I found it here in Vancouver, and the subject matter seems appropriate, I’d like to believe it’s from here. I was originally going to title it Woman on the back deck, but I can’t be entirely sure of that either; it may just be someone with long hair, a hat, and baggy clothes!

On somewhat of a derivative note, take a look at this current show at the Shooting Gallery in San Francisco titled “Smoke Gets in Your Eyes" featuring work by Parisian street artist Christian Guémy (aka C215) focusing on the iconography of smoking ads and images.

Happy New Year everyone! You may see less of me on Tumblr this year, but I love you just the same! May this coming year bring you all good cheer!

UPDATE! Scandalous! This is not, in fact, Vancouver! Thanks to Andrea for tracking down the artist, Toru Sugita. He was born in Shiga, Japan, studied in Kyoto, and since the 1990s he has been residing in the San Fransisco Bay area. I think it’s rather amusing how I was able to project certain local traits into the work, making me believe it might be from here. I suppose my next post of the Vancouver Special pop-up book should make up for any lack of local content. One thing remains - it is a very nice print, and Toru is a fine print maker! I shall keep this print in the collection in his honour (and as a reminder to myself that I sometimes make mistakes!)

Toru wrote to me, mentioning that he has in fact been to the Dundarave Print Workshop on Granville Island when he had a show at the ArtBeatus Gallery in 2002. He informs me that the subject is actually Calistoga, California, and the woman on the deck is his friend visiting from Japan. He also concedes that Vancouver has the much of the same type of light and architecture as southern California, so there you have it! Full circle! : )

Come fly with us! (for a one day vacation), a Grouse Mountain poster calendar from either 1980 or 1986 based on calendar dates, although I think the aesthetic is more 1980, and if it was 1986 they probably would have made some sort of Expo reference. More about the history of the tramway from wikipedia:

The tramway, known as the Blue Tram, was built by Austrian steel company Voestalpine and was opened and inaugurated on December 15, 1966, by Premier W. A. C. Bennett.

Ten years later, the mountain was purchased from its original owners by the McLaughlin family in 1976. The new ownership provided additional funding for the construction of a second aerial tramway, built by von Roll, known as the Red Tram or Super Skyride, that same year. The Super Skyride, using much larger gondola cars holding several dozen passengers, is now the main tram, arriving at a separate top terminal building a short walk from the lodge. The older Blue Tram is now mainly used to transport staff and supplies directly to the lodge structure.

Update: Not really an update; I’m just having second thoughts. I might not have picked up on some clues. The typeface for Grouse Mountain is very Expo86 inspired, and the fact that the gondola becomes a jet aircraft fits very well with the transportation theme of the transpo Expo. This also falls during the summer months at Grouse, right at the peak of Expo 86; maybe this WAS from 86!?

Update 2! I just learned from the artist himself! This is a Bob Masse original design!

A 1969 Greater Vancouver Real Estate Board poster, signed by McLachlan, published by Agency Press Ltd, Vancouver.

Update! I just discovered this is George McLachlan, via his website!

A lost mural of Vancouver, this view of Stanley Park was painted on the side of the Chapel at Stanley Park, at the end of Chilco Street between Alberni and W Georgia. From Luis Curran’s photograph on pbase believed to be taken November 6, 2005:

This mural was originally commissioned by the architect to answer the complaints of those who thought views of Stanley Park would be destroyed by his building on the corner. A new building has since been built right next to it so, inevitably, the mural is now lost!

I’m not certain who the artist was, or even who the architect was for that matter, but surely someone will know! The second image of the site before construction is from the RE/MAX Crest Realty (Westside) site of real estate agents Les Twarog and Sonja Pederson, possibly circa 2001? Any additional info? Comments welcome!

Cross-posted with additional text to VancouverIsAwesome.com

Update! Thanks to a comment at VIAwesome, the artist has been identified as Dana Irving! The work is titled Stanley Lodge and she did the painting in 1995. Thanks for the comment, Mike!

Sketch of the UBC library, west face, artist unknown, 1928, image HP023442 courtesy of Royal BC Museum, BC Archives. Still looking the pretty much the same many decades later.
UPDATE! I have determined who the artist was! It was none other than the first librarian at UBC, John Ridington! This was determined from the front cover of a brochure produced by the library, which was titled Scrapbook for a Golden Anniversary, the University of British Columbia Library, 1915-1965. He gets the cover for the cover art, and the byline “Sketching was one of his many hobbies”. From the UBC blogs:

John Ridington was UBC’s first University Librarian. A former journalist and teacher, he started work on the library collection in August 1914 when UBC was in its temporary home at West 10th Avenue and Laurel Street (the Fairview Shacks).  By 1916, he had been appointed University Librarian, a position he remained in until his retirement at the age of 72 in April 1940. According to information gathered by the UBC Archives, Ridington was known as a rigid authoritarian and was nicknamed ‘King John’.

Hail, King John! A fine piece of work you’ve done here!

Sketch of the UBC library, west face, artist unknown, 1928, image HP023442 courtesy of Royal BC Museum, BC Archives. Still looking the pretty much the same many decades later.

UPDATE! I have determined who the artist was! It was none other than the first librarian at UBC, John Ridington! This was determined from the front cover of a brochure produced by the library, which was titled Scrapbook for a Golden Anniversary, the University of British Columbia Library, 1915-1965. He gets the cover for the cover art, and the byline “Sketching was one of his many hobbies”. From the UBC blogs:

John Ridington was UBC’s first University Librarian. A former journalist and teacher, he started work on the library collection in August 1914 when UBC was in its temporary home at West 10th Avenue and Laurel Street (the Fairview Shacks).  By 1916, he had been appointed University Librarian, a position he remained in until his retirement at the age of 72 in April 1940. According to information gathered by the UBC Archives, Ridington was known as a rigid authoritarian and was nicknamed ‘King John’.

Hail, King John! A fine piece of work you’ve done here!

Here Vancouver was founded, a sketch of Constable Miller’s cottage, from page 34 of Vancouver Historical journal, October 1958 issue at archive.org. This same image (Item # EarlyVan_v7_024) appears in Major Matthew’s Early Vancouver, and upon closer inspection, I can make out the artist’s name in the bottom left, T Sentell, 38 (1938). Volume 7 reveals this to be Thomas F. Sentell, grandson of F.W. Sentell, builder of the first City Hall after the fire of 1886.

Here Vancouver was founded, a sketch of Constable Miller’s cottage, from page 34 of Vancouver Historical journal, October 1958 issue at archive.org. This same image (Item # EarlyVan_v7_024) appears in Major Matthew’s Early Vancouver, and upon closer inspection, I can make out the artist’s name in the bottom left, T Sentell, 38 (1938). Volume 7 reveals this to be Thomas F. Sentell, grandson of F.W. Sentell, builder of the first City Hall after the fire of 1886.

Looking thru the Narrows toward Vancouver, from Marine Drive at Cypress Park, by PAGE? Paul Page. As seen in The Gold Stripe, Volume 3, page 118, circa 1919.
Update: NOW I remember seeing that signature! Shortly after posting my Remembrance Day post, I was reminded by Gary Sim that Paul Page had illustrated in The Gold Stripe. Duly noted! Now if only we could find some more biographical info about him! And I’m curious…I wonder if there is any relation between Peter Hugh Page, who would go on to illustrate BCER pamphlets, maps, and cartoons many decades later…
Update # 2: I dug into the BC City Directories online, and discovered a listing for Paul Page from 1914-1928, and I believe it is the artist above.
He first appears in 1914 in Henderson’s Greater Vancouver City Directory Part 2 as a clerk in the men’s clothing store Arnold & Quigley. He was living at 898 Granville, while Arnold & Quigley was located at 546 Granville Street, right across the street from the Hotel Vancouver #2 & the Opera House. The next year, he is working as a clerk for Tooke Brothers (another early clothing store) while living at the Manhattan Apartments. He works for Tooke Brothers until 1919, when he is first listed as an illustrator, this time living at 904 Nicola Street. This is literally a block away from Roedde House, so I’m willing to bet he knew the Roedde’s as well. In 1920, his listing reads “Signs” and he is situated in suite 316 of the The Daily Province Building, 198 West Hastings Street. The next year, 1921 Henderson’s Vancouver Directory describes him as a “Commercial Artist”, now working out of suite 412 of 198 West Hastings. In 1923, he gets a new address: 777 Burrard! Things must have been looking up to score such a lucky address! The 1924 Wrigley Henderson Amalgamated BC Directory first lists him as an “Advertising Agent”, which repeats until 1928, when Wrigley’s British Columbia Directory describes him as an “Advertising writer”. And that’s where the trail goes cold.
Did he leave town just before the stock market crash of 1929? Did he cash out early or did some bad luck befall him? We may never know, unless someone finds his distinctive signature on something dated post 1928! Keep on the lookout, everyone! Thanks for your help!

Looking thru the Narrows toward Vancouver, from Marine Drive at Cypress Park, by PAGE? Paul Page. As seen in The Gold Stripe, Volume 3, page 118, circa 1919.

Update: NOW I remember seeing that signature! Shortly after posting my Remembrance Day post, I was reminded by Gary Sim that Paul Page had illustrated in The Gold Stripe. Duly noted! Now if only we could find some more biographical info about him! And I’m curious…I wonder if there is any relation between Peter Hugh Page, who would go on to illustrate BCER pamphlets, maps, and cartoons many decades later…

Update # 2: I dug into the BC City Directories online, and discovered a listing for Paul Page from 1914-1928, and I believe it is the artist above.

He first appears in 1914 in Henderson’s Greater Vancouver City Directory Part 2 as a clerk in the men’s clothing store Arnold & Quigley. He was living at 898 Granville, while Arnold & Quigley was located at 546 Granville Street, right across the street from the Hotel Vancouver #2 & the Opera House. The next year, he is working as a clerk for Tooke Brothers (another early clothing store) while living at the Manhattan Apartments. He works for Tooke Brothers until 1919, when he is first listed as an illustrator, this time living at 904 Nicola Street. This is literally a block away from Roedde House, so I’m willing to bet he knew the Roedde’s as well. In 1920, his listing reads “Signs” and he is situated in suite 316 of the The Daily Province Building, 198 West Hastings Street. The next year, 1921 Henderson’s Vancouver Directory describes him as a “Commercial Artist”, now working out of suite 412 of 198 West Hastings. In 1923, he gets a new address: 777 Burrard! Things must have been looking up to score such a lucky address! The 1924 Wrigley Henderson Amalgamated BC Directory first lists him as an “Advertising Agent”, which repeats until 1928, when Wrigley’s British Columbia Directory describes him as an “Advertising writer”. And that’s where the trail goes cold.

Did he leave town just before the stock market crash of 1929? Did he cash out early or did some bad luck befall him? We may never know, unless someone finds his distinctive signature on something dated post 1928! Keep on the lookout, everyone! Thanks for your help!

More transit ephemera posted by the Buzzer: Conceptual drawing of Broadway Station, by DVE LOVE. They are drawn by the esteemed Ronald  J. Love Architectural Illustration, which was founded in New York City  in 1967, and relocated to Vancouver in 1972, according to book The Art of Architectural Illustration by Gordon Grice.

More transit ephemera posted by the Buzzer: Conceptual drawing of Broadway Station, by DVE LOVE. They are drawn by the esteemed Ronald J. Love Architectural Illustration, which was founded in New York City in 1967, and relocated to Vancouver in 1972, according to book The Art of Architectural Illustration by Gordon Grice.

More transit ephemera posted by the Buzzer: Conceptual drawing of Main Street Station, signed by DVE LOVE. They are drawn by the esteemed Ronald J. Love Architectural Illustration, which was founded in New York City in 1967, and relocated to Vancouver in 1972, according to book The Art of Architectural Illustration by Gordon Grice.

More transit ephemera posted by the Buzzer: Conceptual drawing of Main Street Station, signed by DVE LOVE. They are drawn by the esteemed Ronald J. Love Architectural Illustration, which was founded in New York City in 1967, and relocated to Vancouver in 1972, according to book The Art of Architectural Illustration by Gordon Grice.

Windy Day, Vancouver from the 1940s, a numbered aquatint print seen for sale by alexandremaps.com at the Vancouver Antiquarian Book Fair, 2010.
UPDATE! I now know who the artist is! I foolishly thought I’d be able to read his signature, but in the end, I couldn’t distinguish the handwriting. I just came across a gallery which attributed the work to Nicholas Hornyansky, and fortunately, that fits perfectly!
Actually, you can see this item listed on abebooks.com too! Pricey!

Windy Day, Vancouver from the 1940s, a numbered aquatint print seen for sale by alexandremaps.com at the Vancouver Antiquarian Book Fair, 2010.

UPDATE! I now know who the artist is! I foolishly thought I’d be able to read his signature, but in the end, I couldn’t distinguish the handwriting. I just came across a gallery which attributed the work to Nicholas Hornyansky, and fortunately, that fits perfectly!

Actually, you can see this item listed on abebooks.com too! Pricey!

Skytrain cutaway of Burrard Station by Ronald J Love, seen in the book Transit in British Columbia: The First Hundred Years.

Skytrain cutaway of Burrard Station by Ronald J Love, seen in the book Transit in British Columbia: The First Hundred Years.

Vancouver Tourist Association brochure Two Glorious Weeks at Vancouver British Columbia, no date, with front and back cover watercolour illustrations attributed to “Jackson”, believed to be Ronald Threlkeld Jackson (1902-1992). Seen at the Vancouver Antiquarian Book Fair, from aquilabooks.com.

Skytrain cutaway of Waterfront Station by Ronald J Love, seen in the book Transit in British Columbia: The First Hundred Years.

Skytrain cutaway of Waterfront Station by Ronald J Love, seen in the book Transit in British Columbia: The First Hundred Years.