Vancouver, BC, a classic pennant depicted on this hand carved linocut print by District Dogs Designs of North Vancouver. As members of the Vancouver Letterpress League, a local collective of creative letterpress enthusiasts, they were out in force at the Alcuin Society Wayzgoose earlier this month. There’s more Vancouver love in their portfolio as this photo attests, so be sure to check out their wares; available at Shop Cocoon at 3345 Cambie Street, Vancouver, BC.

Vancouver, BC, a classic pennant depicted on this hand carved linocut print by District Dogs Designs of North Vancouver. As members of the Vancouver Letterpress League, a local collective of creative letterpress enthusiasts, they were out in force at the Alcuin Society Wayzgoose earlier this month. There’s more Vancouver love in their portfolio as this photo attests, so be sure to check out their wares; available at Shop Cocoon at 3345 Cambie Street, Vancouver, BC.

The evolution of the Buzzer logos, via the Buzzer blog. Translink’s Buzzer editors will be hosting a Google Hangout on Wednesday, March 27 at noon to 1pm Pacific. It’s your chance to chat all about the history of the Buzzer, plus get answers to any transit questions you might have. Check it out!

The evolution of the Buzzer logos, via the Buzzer blog. Translink’s Buzzer editors will be hosting a Google Hangout on Wednesday, March 27 at noon to 1pm Pacific. It’s your chance to chat all about the history of the Buzzer, plus get answers to any transit questions you might have. Check it out!

Masthead for The World newspaper; “the paper that prints the facts”, dated Monday, March 3, 1913. Note the fine typography employed for the word “Vancouver”, complete with it’s own underline flourish. Thanks to John Mackie for submitting the image! The World was led by the following over its lifetime in print:
1888-1901 J.C. McLagan1901-1905 Mrs. J.C. McLagan1905-1915 L.D.Taylor1915-1921 John Nelson1921-1924 Charles E. CampbellThe masthead above ran during Louis Denison Taylor’s command of the paper, the year following the completion of The World Building (later known as the Bekins Building, now the Sun Tower). Oh, and that “copper” green roof? It’s not actually copper, but simply green paint! The year 1913 was also the year of a worldwide financial depression where the overreach of financial markets caused the building to go into bankruptcy. Ironically, this was also the year that the prestigious Birks store opened at Georgia and Granville, and construction began on the second Hotel Vancouver (1916). 
You can read more of The World’s exploits in the book L.D.: Mayor Louis Taylor and the Rise of Vancouver by Daniel Francis, much of which is accessible online.

Masthead for The World newspaper; “the paper that prints the facts”, dated Monday, March 3, 1913. Note the fine typography employed for the word “Vancouver”, complete with it’s own underline flourish. Thanks to John Mackie for submitting the image! The World was led by the following over its lifetime in print:

1888-1901 J.C. McLagan
1901-1905 Mrs. J.C. McLagan
1905-1915 L.D.Taylor
1915-1921 John Nelson
1921-1924 Charles E. Campbell

The masthead above ran during Louis Denison Taylor’s command of the paper, the year following the completion of The World Building (later known as the Bekins Building, now the Sun Tower). Oh, and that “copper” green roof? It’s not actually copper, but simply green paint! The year 1913 was also the year of a worldwide financial depression where the overreach of financial markets caused the building to go into bankruptcy. Ironically, this was also the year that the prestigious
Birks store opened at Georgia and Granville, and construction began on the second Hotel Vancouver (1916).

You can read more of The World’s exploits in the book L.D.: Mayor Louis Taylor and the Rise of Vancouver by Daniel Francis, much of which is accessible online.

Goad’s atlas of the city of Vancouver, British Columbia and surrounding municipalities in four volumes from 1912. Fire insurance maps are great; I’m posting it here primarily for the typography, but the maps are great too! From Collections Canada, which has volume one (Kits) and two (Grandview) posted out of four. Via Michael Kluckner’s recent blog post at grandviewheritage.blogspot.com.