The End of the Seventies by Michael Kluckner, a full page editorial cartoon from the December 29, 1979 issue of the Vancouver Sun. Michael reminisces about his early cartooning career here on his site. About the cartoon, Michael writes: 

The managing editor bought the original (I wonder if it still exists?) which was a large, about 20 x 30 inch, pen and ink drawing on illustration board. So many faces and events: (from the top including) Vietnamese boat people, Jane Fonda, Kent State, starving Indians, Bill Vanderzalm, Pat McGeer, Dave Barrett, Bill Bennett, the Bee Gees, John Travolta, Rod Stewart, Henry Kissinger, Nixon and Watergate, Gerald Ford, Tom Campbell, Rene Levesque, Pierre Trudeau, the FLQ, Peter Lougheed on the big car (“Let the Bastards Freeze in the Dark”), the oil crisis, Joe Clark, Jimmy Carter, the Jonestown mass suicide, Edward Kennedy, Jerry Brown, Jackie Onassis, Ayatollah Khomeini, Margaret Trudeau (& Mick Jagger – should’ve drawn Ronny Wood), John Diefenbaker as Brutus, Robert Stanfield, David Lewis, Jean Drapeau and Robert Bourassa and the Montreal Olympics, Jean Chrétien, Ian Smith of Rhodesia, Willy Brandt and Brezhnev the Russian premier …. and “Jaws.” The Air Otto reference was for Liberal cabinet minister Otto Lang, one of the pigs at the trough of that era. The only glitch was the blank banner at the bottom, which was supposed to read “How Soon Could We Forget?” in red ink, but it got stripped out of the black plate and not put into the red one by the Sun production crew. Oh well….

Though Michael ultimately never pursued the path of the newspaper cartoonist, we’re grateful for the many contributions he has made to the community since these early days. Heritage advocacy, a lifetime of fine art, and writing and illustrating some 15 books - all of these amount to no small feat! Thanks, Michael!

The End of the Seventies by Michael Kluckner, a full page editorial cartoon from the December 29, 1979 issue of the Vancouver Sun. Michael reminisces about his early cartooning career here on his site. About the cartoon, Michael writes: 

The managing editor bought the original (I wonder if it still exists?) which was a large, about 20 x 30 inch, pen and ink drawing on illustration board. So many faces and events: (from the top including) Vietnamese boat people, Jane Fonda, Kent State, starving Indians, Bill Vanderzalm, Pat McGeer, Dave Barrett, Bill Bennett, the Bee Gees, John Travolta, Rod Stewart, Henry Kissinger, Nixon and Watergate, Gerald Ford, Tom Campbell, Rene Levesque, Pierre Trudeau, the FLQ, Peter Lougheed on the big car (“Let the Bastards Freeze in the Dark”), the oil crisis, Joe Clark, Jimmy Carter, the Jonestown mass suicide, Edward Kennedy, Jerry Brown, Jackie Onassis, Ayatollah Khomeini, Margaret Trudeau (& Mick Jagger – should’ve drawn Ronny Wood), John Diefenbaker as Brutus, Robert Stanfield, David Lewis, Jean Drapeau and Robert Bourassa and the Montreal Olympics, Jean Chrétien, Ian Smith of Rhodesia, Willy Brandt and Brezhnev the Russian premier …. and “Jaws.” The Air Otto reference was for Liberal cabinet minister Otto Lang, one of the pigs at the trough of that era. The only glitch was the blank banner at the bottom, which was supposed to read “How Soon Could We Forget?” in red ink, but it got stripped out of the black plate and not put into the red one by the Sun production crew. Oh well….

Though Michael ultimately never pursued the path of the newspaper cartoonist, we’re grateful for the many contributions he has made to the community since these early days. Heritage advocacy, a lifetime of fine art, and writing and illustrating some 15 books - all of these amount to no small feat! Thanks, Michael!

Aaron Chapman recently came across a piece of vintage Vancouver in his family papers. The print was created by his mother Evadna Chapman, a Vancouver artist in the 1970s and 1980s. About the work, he writes:

[Above is] an old photograph that my late mother took of downtown Vancouver from across the water at Stanley Park, and an illustration she later did. She silk screened the art on a number of hand made greeting cards…

Coal Harbour had been home to an eclectic assortment of squatter shacks and boathouses for many years, until around 1955, when these homes were removed and replaced with the Vancouver Yacht Club Marina. Michael Kluckner talks about this time in his gentrification talk at about 9 minutes 30 seconds here.

Colour logo for the Grandview Heritage Group by Michael Kluckner, previously posted here in B&W,

Colour logo for the Grandview Heritage Group by Michael Kluckner, previously posted here in B&W,

Hycroft by Michael Kluckner, painted for the University Women’s Club which has owned the building for the past half-century. The plaque states the work was donated by Lois Millington in honour of Hycroft’s 100th Anniversary March 2011. Michael writes on his site:


A good party and happy conclusion to a process that began last September with me getting onto the roof of a highrise a few blocks away with a 30 x 36 inch canvas…Normally when you’re painting or photographing architecture you look for a low, corner angle that gives the composition strong diagonals and more drama; this straight-on view is much calmer, more conservative, befitting a mansion so well established in its landscape. The space has to recede in subtle shifts of tone and scale without any tricks of perspective.

Hycroft by Michael Kluckner, painted for the University Women’s Club which has owned the building for the past half-century. The plaque states the work was donated by Lois Millington in honour of Hycroft’s 100th Anniversary March 2011.

Michael writes on his site:

A good party and happy conclusion to a process that began last September with me getting onto the roof of a highrise a few blocks away with a 30 x 36 inch canvas…

Normally when you’re painting or photographing architecture you look for a low, corner angle that gives the composition strong diagonals and more drama; this straight-on view is much calmer, more conservative, befitting a mansion so well established in its landscape. The space has to recede in subtle shifts of tone and scale without any tricks of perspective.

BCIT Almanacs, published in 1979 and 1980 by BCIT and Michael Kluckner, along with a sketch of the BCIT Campus Centre from the 1980 edition. About the books, Michael writes:

I did two of them: one in 1979 and one in 1980. I then self-published a book called Vancouver Between The Streets in 1981 and negotiated a deal with the BCIT Students Association where they got the book with a section at the back of specifically BCIT information. I don’t know whether BCIT continued to produce an annual guidebook. I lost them as a client about 1982 in the great recession, although I continued to teach a course at night there until about 1985. Most of the fun working there was putting out the student newspaper.

If you find a copy of either one of these books, hang on to it; it is filled with all sorts of local businesses, attractions, and all manner of obscure minutia. In fact, it’s a bit like an early version of the Internet - everything you need to know in one book! You should be able to find Vancouver Between The Streets at the VPL; it also appears to be outrageously priced at various online vendors, from $72.69 at Amazon to $180.38 at ABEbooks and $192.21 at Alibris. A true cult title!

The Evolution of the Vancouver Apartment, from Michael Kluckner's Vanishing Vancouver: The Last 25 Years, an entirely new book to be published April 30th, 2012 by Whitecap Books. A number of book launch events are scheduled to coincide with the release of this book next month; to learn more about them, see my cross-post at Vancouver Is Awesome.

Heritage by Michael Kluckner (as seen on p.217 of Vancouver Remembered), part of a series of 4 paintings created for Vancouver’s 100th birthday in 1986. The painting depicts both old and new Vancouver with a view from Frances Street at Victoria Drive, including a corner store, a majestic turreted house, and the modern skyline. Even in 1985, many of the homes depicted along this block did not actually exist at this location, but were instead a representative sampling of Grandview homes. Today, the majestic turreted house at Frances Street and Salsbury Drive remains the sole landmark of Vancouver’s early heritage on this block.

Seen previously: City of the Century by Toni Onley, Waterfront City by Jack Shadbolt, and if anyone has the poster or an image of Hugh RicksSea Otter painting, please send it over! Paintings from this series are tagged “centennial”.

Georgia Street at Burrard, by Michael Kluckner, 1989, from his book Vanishing Vancouver, published 1990. Two decades later, a 20th anniversary edition is set to be published in the fall of 2011.

Georgia Street at Burrard, by Michael Kluckner, 1989, from his book Vanishing Vancouver, published 1990. Two decades later, a 20th anniversary edition is set to be published in the fall of 2011.