Stanley Park Christmas Train, Lost Lagoon Fountain Lights, and Carol Ships Vancouver Harbour (2010) by artist and illustrator George McLachlan.

The Stanley Park Christmas train runs December 5 through January 5, though it is closed Christmas Day. Tickets are available here at Ticketmaster with some reserved at the gates, but I would say advance tickets are a must (the time slots have a tendency to sell out very quickly). More from the City of Vancouver website:

Entrance to the Bright Nights Train Plaza is by donation (you don’t need to purchase train tickets to see the holiday lights)…Train tickets are sold in half-hour time slots. Several trains will depart within each time slot. Avoid the crowds and come out Monday to Thursday in the first two weeks…

Happy Holiday Travels!

Derelict in Coal Harbour, a print by EJ Hughes, from the National Gallery of Canada. This drypoint on buff wove paper was dated 1935, and was a gift of the artist to the gallery. More work from the gallery’s collection here.

Derelict in Coal Harbour, a print by EJ Hughes, from the National Gallery of Canada. This drypoint on buff wove paper was dated 1935, and was a gift of the artist to the gallery. More work from the gallery’s collection here.

Lady Alexandra, brochure for a floating restaurant made from a Union Steamship vessel that was withdrawn from service in 1953. According to wikipedia, the ship was converted into a restaurant in 1960, where it was “…was moored at Coal Harbor in Vancouver.[3] Later the vessel was towed to California, and was wrecked in a storm in March, 1980, at Redondo Beach, California. This brochure was influenced by Bernard Buffet, perhaps?

Coal Harbour by Ivor Williams, circa 1918, from The Gold Stripe, Volume 1.

Coal Harbour by Ivor Williams, circa 1918, from The Gold Stripe, Volume 1.

Deadman’s Island (Coal Harbour), early 20th century. Looking towards the squatters’ shacks on Deadman’s Island. Anonymous watercolour (possibly initialed AA in the bottom right corner). From the Everett Family Collection, in the fine art collection of the Vancouver Maritime Museum.

Deadman’s Island (Coal Harbour), early 20th century. Looking towards the squatters’ shacks on Deadman’s Island. Anonymous watercolour (possibly initialed AA in the bottom right corner). From the Everett Family Collection, in the fine art collection of the Vancouver Maritime Museum.

W R Menchions Shipyard, Coal Harbour, Vancouver (by Miss E M M L Lewis in the 1920s or 1930s), as seen at the Vancouver Antiquarian Book Fair, 2010.

More info on the shipyard from: http://www.library.ubc.ca/spcoll/rescol/rescolm.htmlMenchions, W.R., 1871-1946W.R. Menchions was one of the best-known wooden boat builders in Canada. Born in 1871 in Bay Robert, Newfoundland, Menchions found employment as a boat builder and a fisherman there. In 1896 he came to Vancouver where he soon established what became one of the port’s leading boatyards.

W R Menchions Shipyard, Coal Harbour, Vancouver (by Miss E M M L Lewis in the 1920s or 1930s), as seen at the Vancouver Antiquarian Book Fair, 2010.

More info on the shipyard from: http://www.library.ubc.ca/spcoll/rescol/rescolm.html

Menchions, W.R., 1871-1946

W.R. Menchions was one of the best-known wooden boat builders in Canada. Born in 1871 in Bay Robert, Newfoundland, Menchions found employment as a boat builder and a fisherman there. In 1896 he came to Vancouver where he soon established what became one of the port’s leading boatyards.