Steamworks Imperial Red Ale was released this week, and I must say, they’ve done it again! I’ve been a big fan of the branding at Steamworks in the past, but I think this one takes the cake! City Hall has been transformed into a steampunk fantasy! As stated on the Steamworks Twitter, there are only 650 cases out so if you want to commemorate this brew, I suggest you get your bottle soon! And judging from initial reviews, the beer is very good too! Here’s some more free beer PR:

Steamworks Imperial Red Ale is an 8.5% strong ale that has the following tasting notes:

Our Imperial Red Ale is packed full of intense hop bitterness, flavour & aroma, balanced with complex alcohol flavours and medium high caramel malt character. This full bodied Imperial Red Ale is dark copper in colour with dominant pine, fruit and floral hop aromas. You will find toffee and caramel-like notes on your palate with aggressive hop flavour and bitterness.

Fun City, a cheeky ironic and iconic badge designed and submitted by Ron Braunagel of Torque Design. All those who help to make this a fun city are free to wear this with pride!

Fun City, a cheeky ironic and iconic badge designed and submitted by Ron Braunagel of Torque Design. All those who help to make this a fun city are free to wear this with pride!

Advert for Hume & Rumble Limited, electrical engineers, from page 7 of the Vancouver News-Herald, August 14, 1948. Ad copy states:

The Faith that Built Vancouver

"…mark my words Jim, this town’s gonna grow. In a few years you’ll need a horse and buggy to get from one end of Vancouver to the other. There’s gonna be thousands of people here…more streets…more stores…more homes. Yes, sir—there’s a great future right here and I aim to be part of it!"

Faith in its future built Vancouver from a collection of huts at the water’s edge to Canada’s third metropolis in two generations. The B.C. Electric Railway Co., Ltd has long been associated with this growth…played a major role. Hume & Rumble, Western Canada’s leading electrical contractors, have shared in this spirit for over 30 years…been closely connected with electrical installation work in many great B.C. Industries and enterprises. Latest of these, B.C. Electric’s new trolley coaches are an important milestone on the road of progress in British Columbia.

Part 2 of the Cinderella Stamp collection of Ron Lafreniere in Montreal, this time celebrating Vancouver’s Diamond Jubilee celebrations in 1946. His book titled A Field Guide to the Cinderella Stamps of Canada is available in Vancouver at All Nations Stamp & Coin at 5630 Dunbar, a shop which happens to have a great early Vancouver postcard collection, some of which have been featured here!

Cinderella Stamps from Vancouver’s Jubilee celebrations in 1936. These images came via Ron Lafreniere in Montreal, who has compiled a remarkable reference book dedicated to Canadian Cinderellas (stamp collector’s term for make-believe stamps). His book launched in May 2012 and it looks to be an amazing resource. You can learn more via his website, including the book’s index, galleries of sample pages, and a free checklist of all the Canadian Cinderellas he knows of. His book is available in Vancouver at All Nations Stamp & Coin, a great resource for collectibles on Dunbar.

Higher resolution stamp images updated to be more philatelically correct!

National Newspaper Boy Day, an advert in the News-Herald of Vancouver, a newspaper that started in 1933 and ended in 1957. It looks as though the name written along the laneway and front sidewalk is Allan Booth. A word from Chuck Davis about the paper:

April 24, 1933 The first issue of the Vancouver                News-Herald appeared, operated largely by editorial staff                fired by the short-lived Star. The new paper faced formidable                competition: the Province’s circulation at the time                was 90,265, the Sun’s somewhere in the 60,000 to 70,000                range. The News-Herald’s started at 10,000 and peaked                at 40,000, but it would last until 1957.

So when was National Newspaper Boy Day? Seems it was held across North America on a Saturday in October in the 1940s and 1950s. Here’s another ad from Saturday, October 7, 1950, in the Ludington Daily News. If you can find an earlier or later reference to National Newspaper Boy Day, let me know in the comments. This newspaper ad has been hastily tweaked by me, and was spotted by Vancouver artist Tom Carter.

National Newspaper Boy Day, an advert in the News-Herald of Vancouver, a newspaper that started in 1933 and ended in 1957. It looks as though the name written along the laneway and front sidewalk is Allan Booth. A word from Chuck Davis about the paper:

April 24, 1933 The first issue of the Vancouver News-Herald appeared, operated largely by editorial staff fired by the short-lived Star. The new paper faced formidable competition: the Province’s circulation at the time was 90,265, the Sun’s somewhere in the 60,000 to 70,000 range. The News-Herald’s started at 10,000 and peaked at 40,000, but it would last until 1957.

So when was National Newspaper Boy Day? Seems it was held across North America on a Saturday in October in the 1940s and 1950s. Here’s another ad from Saturday, October 7, 1950, in the Ludington Daily News. If you can find an earlier or later reference to National Newspaper Boy Day, let me know in the comments. This newspaper ad has been hastily tweaked by me, and was spotted by Vancouver artist Tom Carter.

A Souvenir Pillowcase of Vancouver, on glorious printed silk. I’ve covered the souvenir plate meme previously, and this vintage pillowcase is definitely inspired by the tourist art aesthetic. We may never learn who the artists involved were, but looking at the closeup images, the artwork really begins to resemble scenes from a comic book, and I can totally imagine Tintin suddenly blazing onto the scene! I’m having a hard time dating this piece, but I have a hunch or two. For more, plus a DIY contest challenge, check out the cross-post on VancouverIsAwesome.com

Celebrating the launch of the Vancouver Archives digitized version of Early Vancouver online:The Builders, a painting by John Innes, “celebrated Canadian historical artist, for Major J. S. Matthews, later City Archivist, who directed detail and chose title. Cost $1,000. Commenced 1932, completed 1936.” Quotation and source image shown above from Item # EarlyVan_v7_009, part of Volume 7 of Early Vancouver. Image tonality has been adjusted, with colour variants of the painting superimposed. (Colour image of the painting seen in Donald E. Waite’s book, Vancouver Exposed, a History in Photographs.) The scene depicts the first City Council, assembled May 10, 1886, in the largest room of the Court House, also known as Constable Miller’s cottage. Furthermore, the photo depicts Major J.S. Matthews himself, standing proudly beside his painting in the Council Chamber of City Hall, February 1943. Full details of who appears in the painting available in Volume 7 of Early Vancouver.
Congratulations, Vancouver Archives! Now everyone, start reading your city history!

Celebrating the launch of the Vancouver Archives digitized version of Early Vancouver online:

The Builders, a painting by John Innes, “celebrated Canadian historical artist, for Major J. S. Matthews, later City Archivist, who directed detail and chose title. Cost $1,000. Commenced 1932, completed 1936.” Quotation and source image shown above from Item # EarlyVan_v7_009, part of Volume 7 of Early Vancouver. Image tonality has been adjusted, with colour variants of the painting superimposed. (Colour image of the painting seen in Donald E. Waite’s book, Vancouver Exposed, a History in Photographs.) The scene depicts the first City Council, assembled May 10, 1886, in the largest room of the Court House, also known as Constable Miller’s cottage. Furthermore, the photo depicts Major J.S. Matthews himself, standing proudly beside his painting in the Council Chamber of City Hall, February 1943. Full details of who appears in the painting available in Volume 7 of Early Vancouver.

Congratulations, Vancouver Archives! Now everyone, start reading your city history!

City Hall, Vancouver, 1985, by Barbara Elizabeth Wilson (from the Vancouver Archives); Item: 99-29-14; Location: 221-D-3

City Hall, Vancouver, 1985, by Barbara Elizabeth Wilson (from the Vancouver Archives); Item: 99-29-14; Location: 221-D-3

City Hall Postcard, circa 1940s, seen on ebay.

City Hall Postcard, circa 1940s, seen on ebay.