UBC Library, from Illustrated London News, September 22, 1956, by Edward (Ted) Goodall.

In 1942 he began drawing pen and ink and          pencil postcards of Vancouver Island and started the successful “Goodall’s          Pencil Postcard Series.” In 1945 he purchased Inchgarth on Wilmot          Place in Oak Bay and built his first studio. By this time orders for cards          and commercial drawings where coming in steadily and he traveled around          Vancouver Island stopping in at auto courts to meet their owners. In no          time he was doing drawings of the business using his artist license. Usually          he would sell the original to the owner and then have a small quantity          of cards printed…In the early fifties he produced a British          Columbia calendar of scenes from the west coast first in pencil drawing          but over the years eventually replaced them with paintings. These were          very sought after and sold out quickly.
In the mean time he made          contact with the Illustrated London News and they quickly commissioned          him in 1955 to prepare a series of drawings on the new Aluminum smelter          project in Kitimat. This led to many other drawings for the publication          including a series on education facilities in Canada, scenes for British          Columbia’s centennial celebration in 1958 and the Royal Canadian Navy… source

UBC Library, from Illustrated London News, September 22, 1956, by Edward (Ted) Goodall.

In 1942 he began drawing pen and ink and pencil postcards of Vancouver Island and started the successful “Goodall’s Pencil Postcard Series.” In 1945 he purchased Inchgarth on Wilmot Place in Oak Bay and built his first studio. By this time orders for cards and commercial drawings where coming in steadily and he traveled around Vancouver Island stopping in at auto courts to meet their owners. In no time he was doing drawings of the business using his artist license. Usually he would sell the original to the owner and then have a small quantity of cards printed…In the early fifties he produced a British Columbia calendar of scenes from the west coast first in pencil drawing but over the years eventually replaced them with paintings. These were very sought after and sold out quickly.

In the mean time he made contact with the Illustrated London News and they quickly commissioned him in 1955 to prepare a series of drawings on the new Aluminum smelter project in Kitimat. This led to many other drawings for the publication including a series on education facilities in Canada, scenes for British Columbia’s centennial celebration in 1958 and the Royal Canadian Navy… source

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