Vancouver, BC, a classic pennant depicted on this hand carved linocut print by District Dogs Designs of North Vancouver. As members of the Vancouver Letterpress League, a local collective of creative letterpress enthusiasts, they were out in force at the Alcuin Society Wayzgoose earlier this month. There’s more Vancouver love in their portfolio as this photo attests, so be sure to check out their wares; available at Shop Cocoon at 3345 Cambie Street, Vancouver, BC.

Vancouver, BC, a classic pennant depicted on this hand carved linocut print by District Dogs Designs of North Vancouver. As members of the Vancouver Letterpress League, a local collective of creative letterpress enthusiasts, they were out in force at the Alcuin Society Wayzgoose earlier this month. There’s more Vancouver love in their portfolio as this photo attests, so be sure to check out their wares; available at Shop Cocoon at 3345 Cambie Street, Vancouver, BC.

Comic fans at Canada Place, a custom comic created for use in the VanCAF 2013 VIP art books by Sam Logan. VanCAF took place back in May of this year, but with all the images emerging from NY Comic Con, and with fall on the horizon, I thought it would make an appropriate post.

Comic fans at Canada Place, a custom comic created for use in the VanCAF 2013 VIP art books by Sam Logan. VanCAF took place back in May of this year, but with all the images emerging from NY Comic Con, and with fall on the horizon, I thought it would make an appropriate post.

Vancouver sky-line 1995: before the wall! by Roger Kemble.

Alliance Grain Terminal (formerly United Grain Growers) watercolour and graphite by Dan Parke, 1989.

Alliance Grain Terminal (formerly United Grain Growers) watercolour and graphite by Dan Parke, 1989.

A whole new set of electrical box wraps have appeared in downtown Vancouver. The collaboration with ECUAD and the Downtown Business Improvement Association began in 2011, and this is version 2.0. I see Amy Clare Learmonth produced the first illustration, and perhaps a follower can identify who illustrated the other two? More to come I’m sure! Images via Brie Weir on Facebook.

Sad day today for all of New Westminster with the loss of the Copp’s Shoes building and neighbouring businesses.

http://www.theglobeandmail.com/news/british-columbia/heritage-building-collapses-in-massive-new-westminster-fire/article14799418/

Drawings by Urban Sketcher, Won Kang; note the G&M actually featured his colour drawing in their gallery of images. Perhaps the canvas tote idea will still be made available, in memory of the great legacy that was Copp’s Shoes. 

Detail from Pacific Gateway (100) - 50” x 42”, by John Koerner from the foyer of the Queen Elizabeth Theatre, Vancouver. From his website:

The Pacific Gateway Series began after several prolonged stays in Japan. Japanese culture and art had made a deep impression on me when I first saw Ukiyo-e prints at the Louvre at the age of 15.
The Japanese concepts of simplicity and restraint resonated with me, as I had already realized that a meditative mood and serenity needs understatement of colour relationships as it gains a lot in overall strength, balance and solidity. The principle of unity is helped by emphasizing monochromatics.
The theme of this series is the Pacific Rim, which expands over peaceful tide pools of the West Coast beaches toward the sand gardens of the Nihon temples. It also deals with the peaceful arch through which we all must someday cross – from one reality to another.

Yesterday was John Koerner’s 100th birthday. Earlier this year, John was presented with a copy of his new book John Koerner: Drawings and Observations at the Burnaby Art Gallery; Gary Sim wrote about this event here. More about these celebrations from the Province:

On his website, johnkoerner.ca, the artist describes himself as “the oldest still-active member of the Vancouver School of painters, a group that developed modernism in Canadian art.”
“I’m still working,” he noted proudly, “whenever I feel strong enough.
“Then, after a session, I need a rest. I can’t work as long as I used to, but it’s still working.”
Despite some initial trouble navigated the front steps of the gallery — give him a break, he’s 100 — Koerner’s positive attitude shone through in his ever-present smile and the twinkle in his eyes.
“Early in my career I decided what the general direction of my work should be and that, despite the horrors and disasters in this world, it would celebrate all positive values,” Koerner said.

Update! John is currently having a major show at the Penticton Gallery called John Koerner: The Hidden Side of Nature. The show runs from Friday, September 20, 2013 to Thursday, November 07, 2013. At 27:11 in this 32 minute video posted on YouTube, John reflects on his series Pacific Gateways. Here’s even more about the work above from the Penticton Art Gallery:

After retiring from teaching at the University of British Columbia, Koerner bought a house with a view across Burrard Inlet to Point Atkinson, which became the focus of his Lighthouse series which comprises today of over 115 works…The 1970s and 1980’s saw the development of a further three series which contained The Garden of Eden, the colorful African series, and The Pacific Gateway Series - consisting of over 312 visionary works depicting the temporal “arch from here-and-now to another world” and juxtaposing Canadian and Japanese landscapes. Koerner was commissioned to do various murals, the largest as a commemoration of Vancouver’s Centennial in 1986 was installed in the lobby of the Queen Elizabeth Theatre.

Detail from Pacific Gateway (100) - 50” x 42”, by John Koerner from the foyer of the Queen Elizabeth Theatre, Vancouver. From his website:

The Pacific Gateway Series began after several prolonged stays in Japan. Japanese culture and art had made a deep impression on me when I first saw Ukiyo-e prints at the Louvre at the age of 15.

The Japanese concepts of simplicity and restraint resonated with me, as I had already realized that a meditative mood and serenity needs understatement of colour relationships as it gains a lot in overall strength, balance and solidity. The principle of unity is helped by emphasizing monochromatics.

The theme of this series is the Pacific Rim, which expands over peaceful tide pools of the West Coast beaches toward the sand gardens of the Nihon temples. It also deals with the peaceful arch through which we all must someday cross – from one reality to another.

Yesterday was John Koerner’s 100th birthday. Earlier this year, John was presented with a copy of his new book John Koerner: Drawings and Observations at the Burnaby Art Gallery; Gary Sim wrote about this event here. More about these celebrations from the Province:

On his website, johnkoerner.ca, the artist describes himself as “the oldest still-active member of the Vancouver School of painters, a group that developed modernism in Canadian art.”

“I’m still working,” he noted proudly, “whenever I feel strong enough.

“Then, after a session, I need a rest. I can’t work as long as I used to, but it’s still working.”

Despite some initial trouble navigated the front steps of the gallery — give him a break, he’s 100 — Koerner’s positive attitude shone through in his ever-present smile and the twinkle in his eyes.

“Early in my career I decided what the general direction of my work should be and that, despite the horrors and disasters in this world, it would celebrate all positive values,” Koerner said.

Update! John is currently having a major show at the Penticton Gallery called John Koerner: The Hidden Side of Nature. The show runs from Friday, September 20, 2013 to Thursday, November 07, 2013. At 27:11 in this 32 minute video posted on YouTube, John reflects on his series Pacific Gateways. Here’s even more about the work above from the Penticton Art Gallery:

After retiring from teaching at the University of British Columbia, Koerner bought a house with a view across Burrard Inlet to Point Atkinson, which became the focus of his Lighthouse series which comprises today of over 115 works…The 1970s and 1980’s saw the development of a further three series which contained The Garden of Eden, the colorful African series, and The Pacific Gateway Series - consisting of over 312 visionary works depicting the temporal “arch from here-and-now to another world” and juxtaposing Canadian and Japanese landscapes. Koerner was commissioned to do various murals, the largest as a commemoration of Vancouver’s Centennial in 1986 was installed in the lobby of the Queen Elizabeth Theatre.

Under Burrard Bridge, Vancouver by Edythe Hembroff-Schleicher, dated 1936. Coming next Saturday is a special event to celebrate the 6th book in the series The Unheralded Artists of BC, an outstanding set of books by Mother Tongue Publishing. The Life and Art of Edythe Hembroff-Schleicher was written by Christina Johnson-Dean, and the author will be in attendance for an illustrated talk in the private back room of the Railway Club, 579 Dunsmuir Street, Vancouver. The event takes place Saturday, October 5, 2013 from 5-8 pm.

Edythe Hembroff-Schleicher (1906-1994) was a sophisticated, spirited and classically educated artist, researcher, feminist, and writer, known as Emily Carr’s sketching partner and B.C.’s Special Consultant on the now famous painter but unrecognized for her own creative life. This well-researched book finally reveals Edythe’s story as a B.C. artist and features over 100 rarely seen paintings, prints, and photographs. Schooled in Victoria by the Island Arts and Crafts Society’s traditionalist Margaret Kitto, Edythe embarked on further training at the California School of Arts and Crafts and the California School of Fine Arts in the San Francisco Bay area…

The world of art history has a very selective memory, and books such as this help to remedy the art, stories, and lives that are on the verge of being forgotten. It is incredibly important work, and very much in line with what I set out to do here on this blog.
This is the second book in the series that is authored by Christina Johnson-Dean; her prior book being The Life & Art of Ina D. D. Uhthoff which I blogged about here last year. Previous books in this series have covered David Marshall, Frank Molnar, Jack Hardman, LeRoy Jensen, George Fertig, and Mildred Valley Thornton.Cross-posted to VancouverIsAwesome.com.

Under Burrard Bridge, Vancouver by Edythe Hembroff-Schleicher, dated 1936. Coming next Saturday is a special event to celebrate the 6th book in the series The Unheralded Artists of BC, an outstanding set of books by Mother Tongue Publishing. The Life and Art of Edythe Hembroff-Schleicher was written by Christina Johnson-Dean, and the author will be in attendance for an illustrated talk in the private back room of the Railway Club, 579 Dunsmuir Street, Vancouver. The event takes place Saturday, October 5, 2013 from 5-8 pm.

Edythe Hembroff-Schleicher (1906-1994) was a sophisticated, spirited and classically educated artist, researcher, feminist, and writer, known as Emily Carr’s sketching partner and B.C.’s Special Consultant on the now famous painter but unrecognized for her own creative life. This well-researched book finally reveals Edythe’s story as a B.C. artist and features over 100 rarely seen paintings, prints, and photographs. Schooled in Victoria by the Island Arts and Crafts Society’s traditionalist Margaret Kitto, Edythe embarked on further training at the California School of Arts and Crafts and the California School of Fine Arts in the San Francisco Bay area…

The world of art history has a very selective memory, and books such as this help to remedy the art, stories, and lives that are on the verge of being forgotten. It is incredibly important work, and very much in line with what I set out to do here on this blog.

This is the second book in the series that is authored by Christina Johnson-Dean; her prior book being The Life & Art of Ina D. D. Uhthoff which I blogged about here last year. Previous books in this series have covered David Marshall, Frank Molnar, Jack Hardman, LeRoy Jensen, George Fertig, and Mildred Valley Thornton.

Cross-posted to VancouverIsAwesome.com.

Colour logo for the Grandview Heritage Group by Michael Kluckner, previously posted here in B&W,

Colour logo for the Grandview Heritage Group by Michael Kluckner, previously posted here in B&W,

An American’s Guide to Vancouver by Marv Newland in the July, 1979 issue of Vancouver magazine. This cartoon led off a rather interesting article also written by Marv, where he profiles a whole list of cultural noteworthy items and establishments, including our currency, burgers, baseball, and television.
Allow me to take a moment to look back at the businesses mentioned; they include the Fresgo Inn (now moved to Surrey), the Frying Dutchman (now the De Dutch franchise; the original location opened August, 1970 at the current site of Black Dog Video, 3451 Cambie), Lynn’s (now Bikram Yoga Kitsilano), the Topanga Cafe (opened in 1978 and still at 2904 W. 4th Avenue), the Montreal Bagel Factory (now Royal Feet Vancouver Reflexology Acupuncture, I think), Kaplan’s Deli (still at 5775 Oak Street, I believe), Szasz (now the site of the restaurant West, 2881 Granville Street), Rubin’s (formerly at 974 Granville), Dai Kee (formerly at 540 Main Street), Il Corsaro (moved to Maple Ridge after 20 years on the Drive), European News and Import House (no longer on Robson or Hastings), and Universal News & Gifts (possibly the site of Versus Training Center in Gastown?). Oh, and back in 1979, nearly everything was closed on Sundays!
Update! Michael Kluckner adds:

Maybe as late as 1979, Universal News occupied a small low building at 108 East Hastings (now the Acme something-or-other) that had a minor distinction as the city’s first bicycle and auto repair shop. I remember Universal News for its wide range of foreign (and especially radical) newspapers; it was owned by a Finnish immigrant named Paakspuu, whose son I went to school with. There’s probably a connection in there between the shop and the general radicalism of many Finns who came to Canada in that era.

Postcards are a recurring element in Marv’s work, as his site Marv Cards attests. His animation work has been produced in Vancouver under the International Rocketship moniker for over 20 years. Here’s a vintage video which features Marv, circa 2000. You can order a DVD of the best of International Rocketship directly from Marv, as described here on Cartoon Brew.

An American’s Guide to Vancouver by Marv Newland in the July, 1979 issue of Vancouver magazine. This cartoon led off a rather interesting article also written by Marv, where he profiles a whole list of cultural noteworthy items and establishments, including our currency, burgers, baseball, and television.

Allow me to take a moment to look back at the businesses mentioned; they include the Fresgo Inn (now moved to Surrey), the Frying Dutchman (now the De Dutch franchise; the original location opened August, 1970 at the current site of Black Dog Video, 3451 Cambie), Lynn’s (now Bikram Yoga Kitsilano), the Topanga Cafe (opened in 1978 and still at 2904 W. 4th Avenue), the Montreal Bagel Factory (now Royal Feet Vancouver Reflexology Acupuncture, I think), Kaplan’s Deli (still at 5775 Oak Street, I believe), Szasz (now the site of the restaurant West, 2881 Granville Street), Rubin’s (formerly at 974 Granville), Dai Kee (formerly at 540 Main Street), Il Corsaro (moved to Maple Ridge after 20 years on the Drive), European News and Import House (no longer on Robson or Hastings), and Universal News & Gifts (possibly the site of Versus Training Center in Gastown?). Oh, and back in 1979, nearly everything was closed on Sundays!

Update! Michael Kluckner adds:

Maybe as late as 1979, Universal News occupied a small low building at 108 East Hastings (now the Acme something-or-other) that had a minor distinction as the city’s first bicycle and auto repair shop. I remember Universal News for its wide range of foreign (and especially radical) newspapers; it was owned by a Finnish immigrant named Paakspuu, whose son I went to school with. There’s probably a connection in there between the shop and the general radicalism of many Finns who came to Canada in that era.

Postcards are a recurring element in Marv’s work, as his site Marv Cards attests. His animation work has been produced in Vancouver under the International Rocketship moniker for over 20 years. Here’s a vintage video which features Marv, circa 2000. You can order a DVD of the best of International Rocketship directly from Marv, as described here on Cartoon Brew.

A series of linocuts with watercolour by sketchalina, Carol McQuaid, on exhibit at the Unitarian Church in Vancouver later this month. From her blog:

Here are some more for my upcoming show. It’s at the gallery in the Unitarian Church on 49th and Oak here in Vancouver. It’ll run from September 16th to October 15th, and there’s a reception on Sunday the 22nd from 2:30-5…
This church is an amazing community member. They put on a great organic farmers market every Wednesday…There are two awesome gallery spaces, one in the sanctuary and another called the Fireside Room, and they always have interesting shows…
The Ridge screened its last picture show on February 3, 2013. It hasn’t been a part of the Vancouver Film Festival since 2009, but even with the loss of the Granville 7, VIFF marches on! In addition to Vancity and the PC, we’ll be able to watch the big screen in the following venues: The Centre in Vancouver for the Performing Arts, the Vancouver Playhouse, Cineplex Odeon International Village (3 screens at Tinseltown), SFU’s Goldcorp Centre for the Arts, and the Rio Theatre! On with the show!

The Marine Building by McCarter & Nairne, Architects and Structural Engineers. Created for client Stimpson’s Canadian Development Co. Ltd., February, 1929. These most excellent drawings are from the University of Calgary, part of the Canadian Architecture Collection. They also have an outstanding promotional booklet from 1930 drawn and designed by Ronald Jackson, whom I have featured here many times.

In related news, VanHeritage’s repeat event Sunday Morning at the Marine once again sold out, but coffee at the Marine Building any other day sounds like a great way to start your morning!

Vancouver Convention Center, submitted by Delphie Côté-Lacroix. Thanks, Delphie!

Vancouver Convention Center, submitted by Delphie Côté-Lacroix. Thanks, Delphie!

Canadian Fishing Company, Since 1906. This 12’ x 32’ mural was painted in Steveston by Murray Gibbs of Murray’s Signs, operating in the Lower Mainland & Vancouver Island since 1986.

The Lions Gate Bridge, from an ad for the British Properties from May 27, 1939, just a couple years after the bridge had opened. The complete ad has been posted here.

The Lions Gate Bridge, from an ad for the British Properties from May 27, 1939, just a couple years after the bridge had opened. The complete ad has been posted here.