Aaron Chapman recently came across a piece of vintage Vancouver in his family papers. The print was created by his mother Evadna Chapman, a Vancouver artist in the 1970s and 1980s. About the work, he writes:

[Above is] an old photograph that my late mother took of downtown Vancouver from across the water at Stanley Park, and an illustration she later did. She silk screened the art on a number of hand made greeting cards…

Coal Harbour had been home to an eclectic assortment of squatter shacks and boathouses for many years, until around 1955, when these homes were removed and replaced with the Vancouver Yacht Club Marina. Michael Kluckner talks about this time in his gentrification talk at about 9 minutes 30 seconds here.

canadianheroes:


Check out Epic Canadiana a new anthology series from Cloudscape Comics. It’s an ebook, only $3. It re-imagines Canadian heroes from the Golden Age by a bevy of talented BC comic creators. Here’s the book’s synopsis: 
Thrill to the adventures of Canada’s greatest superheroes! The patriotic Johnny Canuck! The mythic Ikniqpalagaq! The enigmatic Loon! The disturbing Ghost-Woman! The activist Jacques de Canada! The mighty Energy Trader! The dynastic Nite-Flyer and Nitro-Girl! The roguish Gin! From Nazi-ravaged Arctic to modern Montreal to post-apocalyptic Vancouver, nine diverse heroes defend the country against a multitude of foes.

Published in 2013, this book features stories from Bevan Thomas, Cody Andreasen, Kamil Ginatulin, Ksenia Kozhevnikova, Shannon LeClerc, Andrew Macklin, Sydney Parent, Alexander Thomas, Colin Upton, Jayleen Weaver, Jeri Weaver, and Morgan Wolf with a cover byChenoa Gao and character files by such artists as Toren Atkinson, Jeff Ellis, Micah Iwaasa, Nina Matsumoto, Cameron Morris, and Jordan Stasuk.

canadianheroes:

Check out Epic Canadiana a new anthology series from Cloudscape Comics. It’s an ebook, only $3. It re-imagines Canadian heroes from the Golden Age by a bevy of talented BC comic creators. Here’s the book’s synopsis: 

Thrill to the adventures of Canada’s greatest superheroes! The patriotic Johnny Canuck! The mythic Ikniqpalagaq! The enigmatic Loon! The disturbing Ghost-Woman! The activist Jacques de Canada! The mighty Energy Trader! The dynastic Nite-Flyer and Nitro-Girl! The roguish Gin! From Nazi-ravaged Arctic to modern Montreal to post-apocalyptic Vancouver, nine diverse heroes defend the country against a multitude of foes.

Published in 2013, this book features stories from Bevan ThomasCody AndreasenKamil GinatulinKsenia KozhevnikovaShannon LeClercAndrew MacklinSydney ParentAlexander ThomasColin UptonJayleen Weaver, Jeri Weaver, and Morgan Wolf with a cover byChenoa Gao and character files by such artists as Toren AtkinsonJeff EllisMicah IwaasaNina MatsumotoCameron Morris, and Jordan Stasuk.

A Souvenir Folder of Vancouver, a postcard printed by the Photogelatine Engraving Co. Limited, Ottawa, via ebay. This page mentions the firm operated from 1910-1953.

A Souvenir Folder of Vancouver, a postcard printed by the Photogelatine Engraving Co. Limited, Ottawa, via ebay. This page mentions the firm operated from 1910-1953.

It happens but once a year, the Emily Carr University of Art + Design student sale! Moments before noon on Friday, a crowd grows restless at the entrance to the Concourse Gallery, and when the ribbon is cut, there is a wild rush of footsteps as art patrons flock to all corners of the gallery in search of an inspiring discovery!

This year marks the 40th anniversary of the student sale, and the selection of paintings, photographs, prints, ceramics, sculpture, (and more) on display are sure to impress! This is no ordinary art show - the work starts to fly off the walls the moment the sale begins! The show is free to attend so arrive early and return often with friends. It really is a great place to see emerging work at the mid-point of the school year, and it could lead you to that perfect holiday gift.

I couldn’t help but be bowled over by the dramatic silkscreen prints shown above by Jonathan Hodges; no matter what size the room, these are destined to command your attention! I also enjoyed taking a close look at paintings by Michael Siu, Gabrielle Strong, Danielle Roberts, and Brett Barmby. I wish you good fortune as you browse this hallowed hall of art; may you find just what you are looking for!

Concourse Gallery, North Building
1399 Johnston Street, Granville Island
Vancouver, BC

Friday, November 22, 2013         12 - 8pm
Saturday, November 23, 2013     12 - 5pm
Sunday, November 24, 2013       12 - 5pm

Cross-posted to VancouverIsAwesome.com

via ECUAD:

Vancouver’s Favourite Seasonal Sale Turns 40!Emily Carr University of Art + Design invites you to join us at our 40th Student Art Sale! Choose from a wide selection of original paintings, photographs, prints, ceramics, sculpture, wearable works, housewares and more. This is a fantastic opportunity to purchase creations from Emily Carr’s up-and-coming artists and designers.Get a jump on your holiday shopping, or take home a little something for yourself!
Concourse Gallery | North BuildingFriday, November 22         12 - 8pmSaturday, November 23     12 - 5pmSunday, November 24       12 - 5pmAdmission is free.

via ECUAD:

Vancouver’s Favourite Seasonal Sale Turns 40!

Emily Carr University of Art + Design invites you to join us at our 40th Student Art Sale! Choose from a wide selection of original paintings, photographs, prints, ceramics, sculpture, wearable works, housewares and more. This is a fantastic opportunity to purchase creations from Emily Carr’s up-and-coming artists and designers.

Get a jump on your holiday shopping, or take home a little something for yourself!

Concourse Gallery | North Building
Friday, November 22         12 - 8pm
Saturday, November 23     12 - 5pm
Sunday, November 24       12 - 5pm

Admission is free.

The Culture Crawl, 2013, part 2! Featured here are Lonely Only by Jon Shaw, The Drive by Lawrence Lowe, Ovaltine by Lori Motokado, Transformer 167 E. Pender by Nadia Baker, and Early Morning Streetscape by Suzy Arbor. See you there this weekend!

The Culture Crawl, 2013, coming this weekend! Featured here are Bright Waterfront by Richard Tetrault, Jericho Beach by Taralee Guild, Chinatown Street by Dave Denson, Drive Dusk by Penny Eisenberg, and Parker Street Warehouses by Jan Kasparec. There is a preview Thursday evening at participating studios; the Culture Crawl begins in earnest on Friday, November 15 and runs to November 17.

View of Sleeping Beauty from the Windows of the Canadian Pacific Railway Hotel, Vancouver, a watercolour by Agnes Gardner King (1857-1929), circa May to June, 1912. This image now appears online in the Library and Archives Canada, Acc. No. 1990-312-21.

Vancouver, a triptych from 2012 submitted by Julia Casol. She writes: 

Cities are unique worlds of their own within larger urban areas. They are thriving, dense, rhizomatic centers, and everyone and everything is connected into one giant network. This triptych is a surreal representation of the city: resembling an organic form of a neuron, I emphasize the network and density present in Vancouver with the urban nucleus and the nexus of roadways, cables, and electrical wires.

 

Vancouver, a triptych from 2012 submitted by Julia Casol. She writes:

Cities are unique worlds of their own within larger urban areas. They are thriving, dense, rhizomatic centers, and everyone and everything is connected into one giant network. This triptych is a surreal representation of the city: resembling an organic form of a neuron, I emphasize the network and density present in Vancouver with the urban nucleus and the nexus of roadways, cables, and electrical wires.

 

Towards Stanley Park, a title I’ve given this watercolour painting by Gordon Kit Thorne, CPE, CSPE, FCA. It was Tom Carter who pointed out to me the building in the foreground is Vancouver’s former Customs and Immigration building, previously located where the Convention Centre is now. The painting appears to say “From the Marine Building” in Gordon’s handwriting in the bottom left, along with the date July 13, 1957, and, ehr, 1956 too (it’s got to be one of those two dates!). If you compare the view from the VPL photo 6193 also shown here, you can actually see the shadow of the Marine Building!

image

image

A linocut of the Woodwards W printed in letterpress by DistrictDogsDesigns, via Instagram. Oh, btw, the W was recently returned to its place AGAIN last month. Not sure what maintenance was required, but I captured the return on both film and photo.

Vancouver, Gateway to the Orient, a bicycle registration decal. On April 22, 1963, Bryan registered his bicycle, but for some reason or other, the bike vanished and the decal was never applied. Now, 50 years later, I present to you bicycle registration number 14414.
At the time, bicycle registration was 50¢, subject to renewal each year. If you sold or gave away your bicycle, you were to mail the certificate to the bike registration depot on 2512 Yukon Street. If your bike was lost or stolen, you would immediately report your bike to the police with this certificate. Given that these registration decals were more like temporary tattoos, I can’t imagine they were very effective.
Today, the VPD recommends you engrave your bike with your DL or provincial ID number with their Log it or Lose it campaign. Alternatively, I believe it was the Kryptonite lock company who created Bikeshepherd.org and sister site Bikerevolution.ca which offer an updated version of bike registration. You can register online for free in their global bike database. You can also purchase 3 tamper-resistant decals for $14.95 which contain QR codes. These codes can rapidly assist anyone linking a found bike to an online directory of missing bikes.
What does the future hold? Well, there’s a whole host of new smart bike tools emerging as we speak; I just found these three on Kickstarter for instance. Oh, and another one! We haven’t quite gotten to the stage where lost bikes will automatically return themselves to their owners, but we’re getting closer.

Vancouver, Gateway to the Orient, a bicycle registration decal. On April 22, 1963, Bryan registered his bicycle, but for some reason or other, the bike vanished and the decal was never applied. Now, 50 years later, I present to you bicycle registration number 14414.

At the time, bicycle registration was 50¢, subject to renewal each year. If you sold or gave away your bicycle, you were to mail the certificate to the bike registration depot on 2512 Yukon Street. If your bike was lost or stolen, you would immediately report your bike to the police with this certificate. Given that these registration decals were more like temporary tattoos, I can’t imagine they were very effective.

Today, the VPD recommends you engrave your bike with your DL or provincial ID number with their Log it or Lose it campaign. Alternatively, I believe it was the Kryptonite lock company who created Bikeshepherd.org and sister site Bikerevolution.ca which offer an updated version of bike registration. You can register online for free in their global bike database. You can also purchase 3 tamper-resistant decals for $14.95 which contain QR codes. These codes can rapidly assist anyone linking a found bike to an online directory of missing bikes.

What does the future hold? Well, there’s a whole host of new smart bike tools emerging as we speak; I just found these three on Kickstarter for instance. Oh, and another one! We haven’t quite gotten to the stage where lost bikes will automatically return themselves to their owners, but we’re getting closer.

The H.R. MacMillan Planetarium, a pen & ink with watercolour submitted by Brian Hebb. Brian writes: “The H.R. MacMillan Planetarium was brand-new when I lived in Vancouver in 1968. Now, this great building is the Space Centre and the Museum of Vancouver. The big crab sculpture sits in a fountain outside the Space Centre/Museum of Vancouver. It’s a wonderful statue of shinny stainless steel sculpted by George Norris for Canada’s centennial year. I painted it yellow to depict the golden hue it exudes in the sunshine.”

You may have noticed the crab was removed recently this year for the upcoming Disney movie Tomorrowland. Here you can see the crab being returned to it’s place.

Kitsilano illustrated by Ken Steacy, a special ghoulish and dystopian Halloween edition! This illustration was created for the first issue of Vancouver Magazine in the new millennium, January/February 2000. This was the second issue of the magazine that Douglas Coupland guest edited. There were four illustrations that accompanied an article titled: Vancouver’s future - will it be beauty and brains or dumb and scum? Most likely a mixture. Four illustrators report back. Ken tells me his contribution was the most dystopic; the caption read: 


Kitsilano, Cornwall and Yew. March 47, 2048, 853 GTX. Complete ecological and political failure: melted ice caps; a botched hepatitis-K vaccine; mass extinction. Moral Cleansing squads sent by a fiat U.S. government invade Kits to snuff out marijuana smokers and render extinct Vancouver’s 10-storey-high “Superpot” trees - a geneticists’ blend of cannabis, timber bamboo, Douglas fir and bermuda grass - that have overrun virtually all other vegetation. 


Thanks for the backstory, Ken!

Kitsilano illustrated by Ken Steacy, a special ghoulish and dystopian Halloween edition! This illustration was created for the first issue of Vancouver Magazine in the new millennium, January/February 2000. This was the second issue of the magazine that Douglas Coupland guest edited. There were four illustrations that accompanied an article titled: Vancouver’s future - will it be beauty and brains or dumb and scum? Most likely a mixture. Four illustrators report back. Ken tells me his contribution was the most dystopic; the caption read: 

Kitsilano, Cornwall and Yew. March 47, 2048, 853 GTX. Complete ecological and political failure: melted ice caps; a botched hepatitis-K vaccine; mass extinction. Moral Cleansing squads sent by a fiat U.S. government invade Kits to snuff out marijuana smokers and render extinct Vancouver’s 10-storey-high “Superpot” trees - a geneticists’ blend of cannabis, timber bamboo, Douglas fir and bermuda grass - that have overrun virtually all other vegetation. 
Thanks for the backstory, Ken!

Vancouver from Little Mountain, Peter Ewart’s contribution to the Expo 86 poster collection. Thanks to Christopher for sending me this image in the comments a while back! Since then, I’ve made contact with Peter Ewart’s daughter, who provided me with the flanking two images that made up this panoramic tryptic view of Vancouver. I’ve stitched together the three images to give an impression of the complete image. A lovely scene from a lovely vantage point in the city!