Another piece of vintage China, this time by Shelley Potteries, it’s a Lions Gate Bridge creamer, via ebay. According to wikipedia:

Shelley Potteries, situated in Staffordshire, was earlier known as Wileman & Co. which had also traded as The Foley Potteries. The first Shelley to join the company was Joseph Ball Shelley in 1862 and in 1896 his son Percy Shelley became the sole proprietor, after which it remained a Shelley family business until 1966 when it was taken over by Allied English Potteries. Its china and earthenware products were many and varied although the major output was table ware. In the late Victorian period the Art Nouveau style pottery and Intarsio ranges designed by art director Frederick Alfred Rhead were extremely popular but Shelley is probably best known for its fine bone china “Art Deco” ware of the inter-war years and post-war fashionable tea ware…

Sublime; a mixed media group exhibition at the Ferry Building in West Vancouver with Charles Keillor, Thom Kline, and Rich Rawling. The show opened last week and runs until this coming Sunday, February 23, 2014 in the Ferry Building Gallery, at 1414 Argyle Avenue in Ambleside, West Vancouver. The gallery is open free to the public from 11 am to 5 pm Tuesdays through Sundays.

Seen here is a graphite work by Charles Keillor, showing North Vancouver’s Lynnwood Inn just after it closed for good in 2012, and Watchful Lion 3, a watercolour painting by Rich Rawling, who writes: 

I was weaving my cruiser bike back to the North Shore after a sketching session at Stanley Park’s Second Beach. As I popped out of the forest at the top of the Causeway there they were. Those lions were looking hungry. But instead of sacrificing my carcass to them I took a few photos in the raking afternoon light realizing that these Art Deco masterpieces would be the basis for a few watercolours. I tip my hat to the sculptor who designed the statues…
The sculptor/designer of the Lions was of course, Charles Marega, a most handsome portrait of whom can be seen here, posing with his creation.

1960 World Figure Skating Championships poster illustrated by John MacKillop, up for auction at Philip Weiss Auctions in NY on February 26, 2014. According to Gary Sim’s British Columbia Artists index, “John M. MacKillop exhibited his work in the B.C. Artists annuals at the Vancouver Art Gallery in 1943, 1944, 1945, and from 1951 to 1953. He also had work in the 1952 and 1953 annual exhibitions of the B.C. Society of Fine Arts.”

The Hollywood Theatre by Sketchalina, via her blog, where she writes:

I did this cut if the Hollywood Theatre on Broadway just after my show in September. It’s such a classic part if Vancouver’s past, and hopefully its future as well. There’s a ‘Save The Hollywood' coalition that's working hard to keep it alive, unlike the Ridge Theatre in my 'Midnight Showing' print, which is already gonzo. So sad. I'm glad there are people out there who care about these things and work hard to preserve the cultural fabric of our city. Rock on you protectors of our past!  Hey, if you're one of those people and you're reading this, contact me. I'd be happy to offer up a print from this run if you're doing any fundraising auctions or anything like that. Go heroes!

The Hollywood Theatre by Sketchalina, via her blog, where she writes:

I did this cut if the Hollywood Theatre on Broadway just after my show in September. It’s such a classic part if Vancouver’s past, and hopefully its future as well. There’s a ‘Save The Hollywood' coalition that's working hard to keep it alive, unlike the Ridge Theatre in my 'Midnight Showing' print, which is already gonzo. So sad. I'm glad there are people out there who care about these things and work hard to preserve the cultural fabric of our city. Rock on you protectors of our past!  Hey, if you're one of those people and you're reading this, contact me. I'd be happy to offer up a print from this run if you're doing any fundraising auctions or anything like that. Go heroes!

Steamworks Imperial Red Ale was released this week, and I must say, they’ve done it again! I’ve been a big fan of the branding at Steamworks in the past, but I think this one takes the cake! City Hall has been transformed into a steampunk fantasy! As stated on the Steamworks Twitter, there are only 650 cases out so if you want to commemorate this brew, I suggest you get your bottle soon! And judging from initial reviews, the beer is very good too! Here’s some more free beer PR:

Steamworks Imperial Red Ale is an 8.5% strong ale that has the following tasting notes:

Our Imperial Red Ale is packed full of intense hop bitterness, flavour & aroma, balanced with complex alcohol flavours and medium high caramel malt character. This full bodied Imperial Red Ale is dark copper in colour with dominant pine, fruit and floral hop aromas. You will find toffee and caramel-like notes on your palate with aggressive hop flavour and bitterness.

Her Valentines, an editorial cartoon by Harry Palmer, from the front page of the Vancouver Daily World, February 14, 1913 (with a little colour added!)
I love the little valentine on the right from South Vancouver, “I hope to be with you soon!” Miss Vancouver doesn’t even notice, completely enamoured with the $8,000,000 Canadian Northern Terminus station!
Happy Valentines!

Her Valentines, an editorial cartoon by Harry Palmer, from the front page of the Vancouver Daily World, February 14, 1913 (with a little colour added!)

I love the little valentine on the right from South Vancouver, “I hope to be with you soon!” Miss Vancouver doesn’t even notice, completely enamoured with the $8,000,000 Canadian Northern Terminus station!

Happy Valentines!

Empire of Ice by Craig H. Bowlsby, with cover art illustration by artist and designer Aaron White. As part of the Vancouver Historical Society’s lecture series, Craig will be speaking about the Pacific Coast Hockey Association on Thursday, February 27, 2014, 7:30pm at the Museum of Vancouver.

Vancouver’s only Stanley Cup, won by the Vancouver Millionaires in 1915, was brought about by the foresight, inventiveness and organization of the hockey-playing Patrick brothers. The Patricks achieved this by founding the Pacific Coast Hockey Association (PCHA) in 1911 and constructing artificial ice arenas in Vancouver and Victoria. The PCHA also brought in the first American teams - Seattle, Portland and Spokane - to fight for the Stanley Cup. Further, their new rules modernized professional hockey and forced a faster game before the Association’s bizarre plummet in 1926. Consequently, the story of the PCHA has become an important part of the hockey story today…

And FYI, I will be speaking on Illustrated Vancouver next month on March 27, 2014; hope to see you there!

Empire of Ice by Craig H. Bowlsby, with cover art illustration by artist and designer Aaron White. As part of the Vancouver Historical Society’s lecture series, Craig will be speaking about the Pacific Coast Hockey Association on Thursday, February 27, 2014, 7:30pm at the Museum of Vancouver.

Vancouver’s only Stanley Cup, won by the Vancouver Millionaires in 1915, was brought about by the foresight, inventiveness and organization of the hockey-playing Patrick brothers. The Patricks achieved this by founding the Pacific Coast Hockey Association (PCHA) in 1911 and constructing artificial ice arenas in Vancouver and Victoria. The PCHA also brought in the first American teams - Seattle, Portland and Spokane - to fight for the Stanley Cup. Further, their new rules modernized professional hockey and forced a faster game before the Association’s bizarre plummet in 1926. Consequently, the story of the PCHA has become an important part of the hockey story today…

And FYI, I will be speaking on Illustrated Vancouver next month on March 27, 2014; hope to see you there!

What he wants in 1913, an editorial cartoon in the Vancouver Daily World newspaper, January 11, 1913, page 6. The cartoon by Boardman (whose first name I haven’t determined) shows Captain Vancouver dreaming of all the things he wants for his city, like a new city hall, False Creek improvements with union depot and railway yards, subways under the CPR right-of-way on Hastings and Pender Street, harbour improvements for Panama Canal trade, and grain elevators for Vancouver. When he says subways under the CPR, he didn’t mean rapid transit subway, but a bridge that went beneath the crazy railway track that unceremoniously cut right through Gastown! Can you imagine the downtown congestion a steam train would have caused?! Dreadful!
This cartoon didn’t make it into my show Vancouver Imagined, largely because I just came across it 2 days ago! It would have been fun to include a few more cartoons and cartoonists in the show, but that’s another show entirely!

What he wants in 1913, an editorial cartoon in the Vancouver Daily World newspaper, January 11, 1913, page 6. The cartoon by Boardman (whose first name I haven’t determined) shows Captain Vancouver dreaming of all the things he wants for his city, like a new city hall, False Creek improvements with union depot and railway yards, subways under the CPR right-of-way on Hastings and Pender Street, harbour improvements for Panama Canal trade, and grain elevators for Vancouver. When he says subways under the CPR, he didn’t mean rapid transit subway, but a bridge that went beneath the crazy railway track that unceremoniously cut right through Gastown! Can you imagine the downtown congestion a steam train would have caused?! Dreadful!

This cartoon didn’t make it into my show Vancouver Imagined, largely because I just came across it 2 days ago! It would have been fun to include a few more cartoons and cartoonists in the show, but that’s another show entirely!

Perhaps the greatest undersold development proposal in the history of Vancouver, here we have uncovered the plans that may have been pitched to the CNR suggesting what they could do with block 52 and the former CPR Hotel Vancouver. I’m reblogging this via pasttensevancouver, with additional images showing a detail of both the old Hotel Vancouver and this proposed perspective drawing from the Library and Archives Canada:

Perspective sketch of remodelling of the old Hotel Vancouver, Wednesday 12 July 1939

Nineteen thirty-nine was the year the current Hotel Vancouver opened and the fate of the much cooler old one would be undecided until after the war when Eaton’s ripped it down for a parking lot where they built their flag ship store a couple of decades later. Had it gone ahead, I believe this building would have consisted of retail stores below a parking garage.

UPDATE: This and other proposed structures that never materialized in Vancouver are part of a show opening today at the Museum of Vancouver called Vancouver Imagined: The Way We Weren’t, curated by Jason Vanderhill of Illustrated Vancouver fame.

Source: Watercolor by P Henderson for the Canadian National Railway, Library and Archives Canada #2963055

I was very interested to include this particular drawing for a number of reasons. It highlighted some key themes in my show; it delves into the question of attribution, it adds detail to the story of the unbuilt city where documentation is often scarce, and it tells the tale of a single drawing which found its way into the National Library and Archives.

First and foremost, I had been searching for any and all information regarding P. Henderson who sketched another one of the presentation drawings in my show. This drew me to the collectionscanada.gc.ca URL which described the drawing, but it had not yet been scanned. I commissioned a scan of the drawing through the Archives website, and was quite surprised to see the result. I’m not sure if the city has ever seen such an uninspiring proposition. The drawing may have been forgotten as quickly as it was drawn, but I’m glad it found its way into our National Archives through a donation from the Canadian National Railways collection.

Though I encountered very little additional information regarding P. Henderson, I was able to determine his first name. Peter Henderson is listed as an architect in both the 1939 Montreal directory and in the book Dear Nan: Letters of Emily Carr, Nan Cheney, and Humphrey Toms by Doreen Walker. I can’t provide extensive biographical details regarding his career (beyond the fact that he was working for the CNR’s architect at the time, John Schofield), but I did learn he was also in charge of art commissions and purchases for the CNR hotel. It seems he had some good taste, as he intended to purchase at least one of Emily Carr’s paintings!

My biggest regret with respect to these drawings is the fate of the original H.C. Wilkinson watercolour retouched by architect Francis S. Swales, which I have featured here before. Where has this original drawing gone? I don’t know if it has been seen since it appeared in the September 1930 issue of Pencil Points, but I hope one day it is rediscovered and properly preserved. Special thanks to the Library and Archives Canada and the Canadian Architecture Collection at McGill University for their contributions to this post.

And so, you now have the back story to one of the featured drawings in my new show at the Museum of Vancouver. There are lots more stories to uncover with respect to Vancouver Imagined; I hope you get to see the show in person!

Cross-posted to Vancouverisawesome.com with alternate text.

Special announcement!

Vancouver Imagined: the Way We Weren’t, a guest curated exhibit (by myself, Jason Vanderhill) officially opens in the studio gallery at the Museum of Vancouver today, Friday, February 7, 2014. The display will feature a collection of reproduction architectural illustrations, as well as a 3-dimensional architectural model from the museum’s permanent collection.

I encourage all to attend; those who are interested in the architectural profession, veterans of the history of the city, and visitors alike should appreciate seeing this alternate history of the city. I’ll have more to say about the show in future posts, and it looks like there will be a curator tour on May the first; here’s the link!

Also take note, the excellent show Play House: The architecture of Daniel Evan White at the MoV has been held over until March 23, 2014! This is now your perfect opportunity to catch two great architecture shows at once!

Very special thanks to all of the illustrators and contributors, to Viviane Gosselin with the Museum of Vancouver, to Matt Heximer of 10four Design Group who designed the show, and everyone else who assisted with its production. I hope you enjoy the exhibit; it was a lot of fun to put together!

jonshawpaintings:

This is a piece I’m working on, that’s about half finished. I’ve got most of the line and colour structure in place, and now I can start giving it a lot of life and volume with shadows and highlights. The image itself is of the Port Metro Vancouver shipping cranes at the foot of Main Street in Downtown Vancouver. It’s a pretty neat and recognizable image, and I’m particularly drawn to all the colour varieties of the cargo containers.

As per Jon’s Facebook page, "Assemblage" is now finished. Watch for it at the Kimoto Gallery in Vancouver.

jonshawpaintings:

This is a piece I’m working on, that’s about half finished. I’ve got most of the line and colour structure in place, and now I can start giving it a lot of life and volume with shadows and highlights. 

The image itself is of the Port Metro Vancouver shipping cranes at the foot of Main Street in Downtown Vancouver. It’s a pretty neat and recognizable image, and I’m particularly drawn to all the colour varieties of the cargo containers.

As per Jon’s Facebook page, "Assemblage" is now finished. Watch for it at the Kimoto Gallery in Vancouver.

Gastown by M. McSweeney, an original painting seen via ebay. You’ll notice Gassy Jack is located on the opposite side of Maple Tree Square where he stands today, but you may be surprised to learn Gassy Jack has been moving around a fair bit since the 1970s. Description via the Gastown Grand Prix Facebook page:

Here’s the statue of Capt. John ‘Gassy Jack’ Deighton in 1973, in front of #1 Alexander, site of today’s Chill Winston. Jack had already been moved four times in four years. Commissioned by a group of Gastown developers in 1970, the six-foot copper statue (created by sculptor Vern Simpson) was offered to the city on Valentine’s Day, 1970. Not wanting to pay for its damage insurance or maintenance, the City refused it, so it was placed in front of #1 Alexander.  It then moved to #12 Water in Gaolers Mews, where it was promptly decapitated. A $50 reward was offered and several weeks later, the head was returned anonymously and reinstalled on Jack’s shoulders. In 1971, prior to the renovation of Gastown, Jack was moved to the Europe Hotel for two years and then back to #1 Alexander in 1973. The statue remained on that spot until 1985, when, fittingly, it came home to its current spot at 207 Carrall Street, where Jack built his Globe Saloon, one of the very first buildings in Vancouver, back in 1867.

A new plaque was installed on the base of the barrel during Vancouver’s centennial year; the plaque reads:

"Gassy Jack" 1830-1875, the Founding Father of Gastown. John Deighton was born in Hull, England. He was an Adventurer, River Boat Pilot and Captain, but best known for his "Gassy" monologues as a saloonkeeper. His Deighton House Hotel erected here on the first subdivided lot burned in the Great Fire of June 13, 1886.
On December 25, 1986, this statue was dedicated to the City of Vancouver by the owner of this historic site, Howard Meakin, a third generation Vancouver Realtor.

Gastown by M. McSweeney, an original painting seen via ebay. You’ll notice Gassy Jack is located on the opposite side of Maple Tree Square where he stands today, but you may be surprised to learn Gassy Jack has been moving around a fair bit since the 1970s. Description via the Gastown Grand Prix Facebook page:

Here’s the statue of Capt. John ‘Gassy Jack’ Deighton in 1973, in front of #1 Alexander, site of today’s Chill Winston. Jack had already been moved four times in four years. Commissioned by a group of Gastown developers in 1970, the six-foot copper statue (created by sculptor Vern Simpson) was offered to the city on Valentine’s Day, 1970. Not wanting to pay for its damage insurance or maintenance, the City refused it, so it was placed in front of #1 Alexander.

It then moved to #12 Water in Gaolers Mews, where it was promptly decapitated. A $50 reward was offered and several weeks later, the head was returned anonymously and reinstalled on Jack’s shoulders. In 1971, prior to the renovation of Gastown, Jack was moved to the Europe Hotel for two years and then back to #1 Alexander in 1973. The statue remained on that spot until 1985, when, fittingly, it came home to its current spot at 207 Carrall Street, where Jack built his Globe Saloon, one of the very first buildings in Vancouver, back in 1867.

A new plaque was installed on the base of the barrel during Vancouver’s centennial year; the plaque reads:

"Gassy Jack" 1830-1875, the Founding Father of Gastown. John Deighton was born in Hull, England. He was an Adventurer, River Boat Pilot and Captain, but best known for his "Gassy" monologues as a saloonkeeper. His Deighton House Hotel erected here on the first subdivided lot burned in the Great Fire of June 13, 1886.

On December 25, 1986, this statue was dedicated to the City of Vancouver by the owner of this historic site, Howard Meakin, a third generation Vancouver Realtor.

Birds’ Eye View of A Proposed Scheme for the University of British Columbia by architect Thomas Hooper, dating back to 1912. Looking like a scaled down version of the Vatican, Hooper’s entry was ultimately rejected in favour of a proposal submitted by Sharp and Thompson. I posted some of those drawings here previously. For more on this drawing and early UBC history, click here and here.

Hooper can take credit for a number of iconic Vancouver buildings which survive to this day; the West Wing of the Provincial Courthouse (now the Art Gallery), the BC Permanent Loan Building, the Winch Building (now part of the Sinclair Centre), and East End Public School (now Strathcona Elementary School). He’s also responsible for St. Ann’s Academy in Victoria, among numerous other notable buildings in the capital and elsewhere. From UVic:

He worked all over BC in Victoria, Vancouver, Revelstoke, Vernon, and Chilliwack focusing on large, public commissions. However, the local economy and Hooper’s business took a sharp decline in 1913. Hooper moved his practice to New York in 1915, but he lost his market again when the United States entered the war…

Along the theme of architectural proposals, renderings, and the unbuilt city, stay tuned for an exciting announcement! More info coming later this week!

Hastings Track (2013) 70”x40” acrylic on canvas by Taralee Guild, available at Art Junction. I first saw this on the 2013 Culture Crawl, and I must say, everything about this canvas is impressive! I took an action shot on Instagram in order to keep the memory of this painting alive, but I recommend you see it in person!

Hastings Track (2013) 70”x40” acrylic on canvas by Taralee Guild, available at Art Junction. I first saw this on the 2013 Culture Crawl, and I must say, everything about this canvas is impressive! I took an action shot on Instagram in order to keep the memory of this painting alive, but I recommend you see it in person!

Hotel Grosvenor by Edward Goodall. I had featured almost this exact view of the hotel way back in the beginning of this blog with this 1936 advertisement. As I also mentioned previously, he began “Goodall’s Pencil Postcard Series” in 1942, and although the vintage of the vehicles in the front of this hotel look decidedly older, Citroën, MG, and AC all produced cars which resemble these well into the 1950s. Thanks for the postcard Tom!

Hotel Grosvenor by Edward Goodall. I had featured almost this exact view of the hotel way back in the beginning of this blog with this 1936 advertisement. As I also mentioned previously, he began “Goodall’s Pencil Postcard Series” in 1942, and although the vintage of the vehicles in the front of this hotel look decidedly older, Citroën, MG, and AC all produced cars which resemble these well into the 1950s. Thanks for the postcard Tom!